sprang


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sprang

 (sprăng)
v.
A past tense of spring.

sprang

(spræŋ)
vb
the past tense of spring

spring

(sprɪŋ)

v. sprang or, often, sprung; sprung; spring•ing; v.i.
1. to rise, leap, or move suddenly and swiftly: a tiger about to spring.
2. to be released suddenly from a constrained position: The door sprang open.
3. to issue forth suddenly or forcefully: Oil sprang from the well.
4. to come into being; arise: Industries sprang up in the suburbs.
5. to have as one's birth or lineage: to spring from seafaring folk.
6. to extend upward.
7. to take an upward course or curve from a point of support, as an arch.
8. to occur suddenly: An objection sprang to mind.
9. to become bent or warped.
v.t.
10. to cause to spring.
11. to cause the sudden operation of: to spring a trap.
12. to cause to work loose, warp, or split: Moisture sprang the board from the fence.
13. to undergo the development of: sprang a leak.
14. to bend by force.
15. to produce by surprise: to spring a joke.
16. to leap over.
17. Slang. to secure the release of from confinement.
18. spring for, Informal. to pay for; treat someone to.
n.
19. an act of springing; a sudden leap or bound.
20. an elastic quality: a spring in his walk.
21. a structural defect caused by a warp or crack.
22. an issue of water from the ground.
23. the place of such an issue: mineral springs.
24. a source; fountainhead: a spring of inspiration.
25. an elastic contrivance or body, as a strip or wire of steel coiled spirally, that recovers its shape after being compressed, bent, or stretched.
26. the season between winter and summer, marked by the budding and growth of plants and the onset of warmer weather: in the Northern Hemisphere from the March equinox to the June solstice; in the Southern Hemisphere from the September equinox to the December solstice.
27. the first stage and freshest period: the spring of life.
28. Also called springing.
a. the point at which an arch or dome rises from its support.
b. the rise or the angle of the rise of an arch.
[before 900; Old English springan, c. Old Frisian springa, Old Saxon, Old High German springan, Old Norse springa; (n.) Old English spring issue of a stream, c. Middle Low German, Old High German spring]
References in classic literature ?
Then all of a sudden, on Easter Monday, a warm wind sprang up, storm clouds swooped down, and for three days and three nights the warm, driving rain fell in streams.
was the next command, and the crew sprang for the handspikes.
But when the nurse saw his uncouth face and full beard, she was afraid and sprang up and fled and left the child.