sprouted


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

sprout

 (sprout)
v. sprout·ed, sprout·ing, sprouts
v.intr.
1. To begin to grow; give off shoots or buds.
2. To emerge and develop rapidly: businesses that sprouted along the highway.
v.tr.
To allow or cause to come forth and grow: He sprouted a mustache.
n.
1. Young plant growth, such as a bud or shoot.
2. Something resembling or suggestive of a sprout, as in rapid growth: "a tall blond sprout of a boy" (Anne Tyler).
3. sprouts
a. The young shoots of plants such as alfalfa and soybean, usually eaten raw.
b. Brussels sprouts.

[Middle English spruten, from Old English -sprūtanin āsprūtan, to sprout forth); see sper- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sprouted - (of growing vegetation) having just emerged from the ground; "the corn is sprouted"
botany, flora, vegetation - all the plant life in a particular region or period; "Pleistocene vegetation"; "the flora of southern California"; "the botany of China"
up - being or moving higher in position or greater in some value; being above a former position or level; "the anchor is up"; "the sun is up"; "he lay face up"; "he is up by a pawn"; "the market is up"; "the corn is up"
References in classic literature ?
But in spite of all this, the soldiers of Denisov's squadron fed chiefly on "Mashka's sweet root," because it was the second week that the last of the biscuits were being doled out at the rate of half a pound a man and the last potatoes received had sprouted and frozen.
They found the ashes scattered by the wind, but the peas and lentils had sprouted, and grown sufficiently above the ground, to guide them in the moonlight along the path.
Anne's eyes shone all that day; literary ambitions sprouted and budded in her brain; their exhilaration accompanied her to Jennie Cooper's walking party, and not even the sight of Gilbert and Christine, walking just ahead of her and Roy, could quite subdue the sparkle of her starry hopes.
The close green walls of privet, that had bordered the principal walk, were two-thirds withered away, and the rest grown beyond all reasonable bounds; the old boxwood swan, that sat beside the scraper, had lost its neck and half its body: the castellated towers of laurel in the middle of the garden, the gigantic warrior that stood on one side of the gateway, and the lion that guarded the other, were sprouted into such fantastic shapes as resembled nothing either in heaven or earth, or in the waters under the earth; but, to my young imagination, they presented all of them a goblinish appearance, that harmonised well with the ghostly legions and dark traditions our old nurse had told us respecting the haunted hall and its departed occupants.
Thin spears of grass sprouted from the distended mouth, and fringed the outline of the head and arms.
Before us was a great excavation, not very recent, for the sides had fallen in and grass had sprouted on the bottom.
A review published by Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition agrees, pointing out that studies have failed to find a substantive nutrient gain when feeding birds sprouted rather than ungerminated grains.
Chefs and bakers are increasingly using sprouted grains in recipes, and food manufacturers are using sprouted grains in cereal, bread, snack chips, pasta, and other packaged foods.
The European Sprouted Seeds Association has welcomed the new set of rules, describing them as "feasible".
Sprouted seed suppliers are looking to set up a new industry body and introduce a quality label in a bid to restore confidence after their products were implicated in E.
On coastal foothill woodlands, Longhurst (1956) found that evergreen oaks sprouted better than deciduous oaks, and that there was a tendency for sprouting to decline with age for deciduous species.