spruce budworm


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spruce budworm

n.
The larva of any of several tortricid moths of the genus Choristoneura of the United States and Canada that damages spruce, fir, and other conifers by feeding on buds and young needles, especially the eastern spruce budworm (C. fumiferana) and the western spruce budworm (C. occidentalis).

spruce′ bud`worm

(ˈbʌdˌwɜrm)
n.
the larva of a common moth, Choristoneura fumiferana, that is a destructive pest primarily of spruce and balsam fir in the northern and northeastern U.S. and in Canada.
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News reports of the western spruce budworm ravaging the British Columbia forest, or the brown spruce long-horn beetle infesting more than 6,000 trees in Halifax are indications the Canadian ecosystem is unprotected in the face of growing global trade, travel and tourism.
An exception is the southern population of the western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) in New Mexico, which had two outbreaks during troughs of sunspot activity.
Alaska: Entire watersheds are at extreme risk in Alaska, where over three million acres of spruce forests have been killed by spruce budworm in the last
Squarely in his sights is the Spruce Budworm, considered one of the forestry industry's most destructive pests.
Spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) was present in the mature white spruce stands for two years during the 1989 through 1993 time period.
Among the company's largest ongoing projects is tackling the cyclical spruce budworm problem in Saskatchewan.
Stand response to western spruce budworm and Douglas-fir bark beetle outbreaks, Colorado Front Range.
This is because, in spruce budworm, the recruitment of a new generation can be enormously influenced by the proportion of eggs brought in by immigrating moths.
First comes the spruce budworm which doesn't just fancy spruces but quite a few other trees, especially Douglas-fir.
Defoliation damage by spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana Clem.) and the occurrence of previous browsing by moose were also recorded for all trees each year.
Virtually all of the fir decline occurred in Maine, where the spruce budworm has been active.
Western spruce budworm and dwarf mistletoe infest the crowded firs.