spun yarn

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spun yarn

n.
A lightweight line made of several rope yarns loosely wound together, used for seizings onboard ship.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

spun yarn

or

spunyarn

n
(Nautical Terms) nautical small stuff made from rope yarns twisted together
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

spun′ yarn′


n.
1. yarn produced by spinning fibers into a continuous strand.
2. cord formed of rope yarns loosely twisted together, for serving ropes, bending sails, etc.
[1350–1400]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spun yarn - (nautical) small stuff consisting of a lightweight rope made of several rope yarns loosely wound together
sailing, seafaring, navigation - the work of a sailor
small stuff - any light rope used on shipboard
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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