spycatcher


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spycatcher

(ˈspaɪˌkætʃə)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Brit a person who works in counterintelligence to detect enemy espionage activities
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

spycatcher

[ˈspaɪkætʃəʳ] Nagente mf de contraespionaje
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
1995 PETER WRIGHT, Former MI5 officer, author of Spycatcher.
Remember Cabinet Secretary Robert Armstrong, who invented "economical with the truth" at the farcical 1986 MI5 Spycatcher trial?
Big at the box office: The Truman Show 1988 During an address to the European Parliament, Pope John Paul II is heckled and called 'the Antichrist' by DUP leader the Rev Dr Ian Paisley, two Australian police officers are shot dead in an ambush in the Melbourne suburb of South Yarra, and the House of Lords rules that extracts of the banned book Spycatcher, written by former MI5 officer Peter Wright, can be published.
WHILE YOU'RE THERE Ventnor has a great little beach and the Spycatcher Inn is a fabulous old pub, festooned with nautical memorabilia.
Similar revelations of political dirty tricks by MI6 and MI5 emerged in Peter Wright's Spycatcher book - a book the Thatcher Government tried to ban on the preposterous grounds it disclosed "Official Secrets" and was "a threat to national security."
(5.) As described in Michael Weiss, "Estonia: The Little Spycatcher Who Could," Daily Beast, April 15, 2017, http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2017/04/15/estonia-the-little-spycatcher-who-could.html.
In Spycatcher, ex-MI5 assistant director Peter Wright openly wrote about a MI5-CIA plot against Wilson.
Files relating to the Spycatcher case, concerning the Government's efforts to suppress the memoirs of former MI5 officer Peter Wright were also held back.
Today, Jaffna's shelves groan under the weight of books on computer science and mathematics, along with bestsellers from Peter Wright's Spycatcher to Bill Bryson's Made in America," writes Julie McCarthy, who is an international correspondent for the South Asian region for the Washington-based National Public Radio (NPR)".
THE most stupendously stupid act of censorship I ever witnessed was the 1987 Spycatcher affair.
1988: The British Government fails to stop publication of the controversial book Spycatcher, written by a former secret service agent.
As a young lawyer in 1986 he ran rings around witnesses in a high-profile trial in which former British prime minister Margaret Thatcher's government had sought to ban the publication in Australia of 'Spycatcher', the memoirs of former MI5 officer Peter Wright.