squall line

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squall line

n.
A line of thunderstorms preceding a cold front.

squall line

n
(Physical Geography) a narrow zone along a cold front along which squalls occur. See also line squall
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.squall line - a cold front along which squalls or thunderstorms are likely
cold front, polar front - the front of an advancing mass of colder air
References in periodicals archive ?
I had an immediate visceral response rooted in memories of growing up in Kansas, seeing vast tornado-spawning squall lines, their blue-green tint indicating they were pregnant with hail.
While in the same vein, Air Traffic Controllers (ATC) and Flight Crews/Operators have been urged to ensure total compliance with all aerodromes operating minima, the NCAA mentioned some impending adverse weather conditions to include: severe thunderstorms, squall lines microburst or low-level wind-shear as observed or forecast by NiMET.'
2017) numerical simulations of squall lines have shown that a bore propagating through the stable boundary layer (SBL) is capable of lifting unstable air, leading to the development of deep convective cells that merge into an MCS.
In recent years, most frequent, strong convective weather events (e.g., squall lines) were associated with the northeast cold vortex.
As it turned out, two squall lines had converged on the carrier.
This feature is in contrast to that of typical squall lines, which generally have a broad area of stratiform precipitation located behind the leading-edge convection (Yu and Tsai 2013; Meng and Zhang 2012).
Squall lines can propagate storms well ahead of the line.
These significant events can be caused by disturbances in other systems patterns known as the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) [8], Upper Tropospheric Cyclonic Vortex (VCAN) [9], disturbances in the trade winds [10], squall lines [11], front systems in southern of NEB [12], and South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) [13].
Cold fronts are probably the most dangerous, and are associated with bands of thunderstorms and fast-moving squall lines. Warm fronts, in turn, typically generate low ceilings and steady precipitation.
They can form by themselves (single cell, super cell, or airmass), or in clusters (frontal, squall lines, or mesoscale-convective complexes-MCCs).