squaloid

squaloid

(ˈskweɪlɔɪd)
adj
of, relating to, or like a shark, or specifically the dogfish (Squalidae) family of sharks
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, larger squaloid sharks similar in size to velvet dogfish tend to be benthic, slope, or shelf dwellers, whereas the majority of oceanic dogfish species are smaller species (Hubbs et al., 1967; Pikitch et al., 2008).
coelolepis) (Yano and Tanaka, 1988; Girard and Du Buit, 1999), both of which are relatively large squaloid sharks.
Lanternsharks (Squaliformes: Etmopteridae: Etmopterus) are the most species-rich group of squaloid sharks with more than thirty small, darkly colored species recognized within the genus (Compagno et al.
Review of the deep sea squaloid shark genus Scymnodon of Japan, with adescription of a new species.
Squaloids of the genera Deania, Etmopterus, Oxynotus, and Dalatias in New Zealand waters.
Isistius brasiliensis, a squaloid shark, the probable cause of crater wounds on fishes and cetaceans.
The squaloid shark Echinorhinus brucus off Virginia.
Review of the deep sea squaloid shark genus Scymnodon off Japan, with a description of a new species.
For example, squaloid sharks have biennial cycles with concurrent vitellogenesis and gestation (see below), while sharks of the genus Carcharhinus generally have biennial cycles with consecutive, year-long vitellogenesis and gestation (Castro 1993, 1996).
The bioenergetics approach used by Stillwell and Kohler (1982) did not include growth information and was based on the volume of oxygen consumption (V[O.sub.2]) extrapolated from four species of squaloid sharks.
The squaloid sharks of the Philippine Archipelago, with descriptions of new genera and species.
Quick and dirty tabulation of stomach contents and maturity stages for skates (Rajidae), squaloid and other ovoviviparous and viviparous species of sharks.