squalor


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squal·or

 (skwŏl′ər)
n.
A filthy and wretched condition or quality.

[Latin squālor, from squālēre, to be filthy; see squalid.]

squalor

(ˈskwɒlə)
n
the condition or quality of being squalid; disgusting dirt and filth
[C17: from Latin]

squal•or

(ˈskwɒl ər, ˈskwɔ lər)

n.
the condition of being squalid; filth and misery.
[1615–25; < Latin squālor dirtiness =squāl(ēre) to be dirty, encrusted + -or -or1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.squalor - sordid dirtiness
dirtiness, uncleanness - the state of being unsanitary

squalor

squalor

noun
Translations
قَذارَه
špína
kummerlige forhold
mocsok
eymd, vesæld

squalor

[ˈskwɒləʳ] Nmiseria f, vileza f
to live in squalorvivir en la miseria, vivir en la sordidez

squalor

[ˈskwɒlər] nconditions fpl sordides

squalor

nSchmutz m; (= moral squalor)Verkommenheit f; the squalor of the conditionsdie elenden or erbärmlichen Verhältnisse; to live in squalorin unbeschreiblichen Zuständen leben

squalor

[ˈskwɒləʳ] nsquallore m

squalid

(ˈskwolid) adjective
very dirty or filthy. The houses are squalid and overcrowded.
ˈsqualor (-lə) noun
They lived in squalor.
References in classic literature ?
Yet the very fact that I was full of a strong desire to win caused this gambling for gain, in spite of its attendant squalor, to contain, if you will, something intimate, something sympathetic, to my eyes: for it is always pleasant to see men dispensing with ceremony, and acting naturally, and in an unbuttoned mood.
A gipsy encampment to-day is little more than a moving slum, a scab of squalor on the fair face of the countryside.
The occasional emergence of an Equilateral from the ranks of his serf-born ancestors is welcomed, not only by the poor serfs themselves, as a gleam of light and hope shed upon the monotonous squalor of their existence, but also by the Aristocracy at large; for all the higher classes are well aware that these rare phenomena, while they do little or nothing to vulgarize their own privileges, serve as a most useful barrier against revolution from below.
If anyone could save me from this squalor, and restore to me my good name, and avert from me future poverty and want and misfortune, he is the man to do it.
What I finally perceived was that his poem came through him from the heart of Italian life, such as it was in his time, and that whatever it teaches, his poem expresses that life, in all its splendor and squalor, its beauty and deformity, its love and its hate.
Rude stubborn self- help here; a whole world of squalor, rudeness, confused misery and want, yet of nobleness and manfulness withal.
The whole formed such a contrast to themselves, as they lay wallowing, like some obscene animals, in their squalor and wickedness on the two heaps of straw, that for a few moments they looked on without speaking, and felt almost ashamed.
In the Protestant cantons you never see such poverty and dirt and squalor as you do in this Catholic one; you never see the lanes and alleys flowing with foulness; you never see such wretched little sties of houses; you never see an inverted tin turnip on top of a church for a dome; and as for a church-bell, why, you never hear a church-bell at all.
he cried, shouting in at the open door, through which much squalor was visible.
amid the ripple of light laughter and the sparkle of bright eyes; and this deep knowledge was dug up in the quiet study, where the bust of Pallas looks serenely down on the leather-scented shelves; and this heap belongs to the crowded street; and that to the daisied field--the heap that would tower up high above the rest as a mountain above hills would be the one at which we should look up and say: this noblest pile of all--these glorious paintings and this wondrous music, these trumpet words, these solemn thoughts, these daring deeds, they were forged and fashioned amid misery and pain in the sordid squalor of the city garret.
His soul danced with joy at that picture of starvation which is so good-humoured, of squalor which is so picturesque, of sordid love which is so romantic, of bathos which is so moving.
The older woman carried herself with a regal dignity that seemed quite remarkable in a place of such primitive squalor.