squamation


Also found in: Medical.

squa·ma·tion

 (skwə-mā′shən)
n.
1. The condition of being scaly.
2. An arrangement of scales, as on a fish.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

squamation

(skweɪˈmeɪʃən)
n
1. (Biology) the condition of having or forming scales or squamae
2. (Zoology) the arrangement of scales in fishes or reptiles
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

squa•ma•tion

(skweɪˈmeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the state of being squamate.
2. the arrangement of the squamae or scales of an animal.
[1880–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
From this day onwards the juvenile stage is characterized by the completion of squamation of the body surface, the appearance of the typical coloration of the species and accelerate body growth.
The natural mould of the ventral side of the skull, shoulder girdle and squamation of Eusthenodon sp.
6), with the scales shown in lateral view and a good number of vertebral centra protruding through the squamation. The caudal fin is entirely missing.
Frontal squamation nomenclature follows that described by Hoedeman (1958), and the cephalic neuromast series are described according to Costa (2006).
Larval fish were identified as yolk-sac larvae, larvae, or juveniles based on family specific characteristics (i.e., fin ray development, mouth position, and squamation) and measured to the nearest tenth of a millimeter.
Scale morphology and squamation patterns in cichlids (Teleostei, Perciformes): Acomparative study.
1 n order to determine die cellular origin of these hyperplastic lesions and the possible presence of squamation, the tissue sections were imnumohisrochemically evaluated using several cytokeratin and epithelial cell markers in SHHF rats.
At the upper layers of stratified squamous epithelia, viral DNA is packaged into capsids and virions produced are freed through normal de squamation processes, triggering little inflammation (14).
The two types of pen shell--scaly type and smooth type--are defined by the presence or absence of squamation of the shell surface (Torigoe 1985).