squarson

squarson

(ˈskwɑːsən)
n
(Sociology) jocular English a clergyman who is also main local landowner
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
(11.) Bickford Dickinson, Sabine Baring-Gould: Squarson, Writer and Folklorist 1834-1924 (Newton Abbot: David and Charles, 1970), pp.
JP (1834-1924) was a famous example of the "squarson dilettante" (Cannadine 1990:257).
1970 Sabine Baring-Gould: Squarson, Writer and Folklorist, 1834-1924 David & Charles, Newton Abbot.
(43) He also encouraged a 'squarson' system by which he hoped for an increase in the number of priests who would be attracted to Australia and relieve the clergy shortage while at the same time solving the dilemma of their payment.
Unbeknown to all concerned, the squarson system, deemed to be desirable for its potential end result, was destined to deliver most of its participants to enduring financial want.
Dickinson, Sabine Baring-Gould, Squarson, Writer and Folklorist, 1834-1924 (Newton Abbot: David & Charles, 1970); and William Ernest Purcell, Onward Christian Soldier; A Life of Sabine Baring-Gould, Parson, Squire, Novelist, Antiquary, 1834-1924 (London: Longmans, Green, 1957).
Baring-Gould, the editor of what has until now been the sum, apogee, and indispensable Sherlockian opus desiderabilissimus, the monumental cornerstone volume, was the grandson of the Reverend Sabine Baring-Gould (1834-1924), a Devonshire man, 'the last of the squarsons' (squire parsons), lord of the manor of the 3,000 acres of Lew-Trenchard, a great estate in North Devon, and author of an enormous number of books, including some on werewolves and ghost lore, as well as of the words of two well-known hymns--'Onward Christian Soldiers' and 'Now the Day is Over'.