squattocracy


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squattocracy

(skwɒˈtɒkrəsɪ)
n
(Sociology) chiefly Austral squatters collectively, regarded as rich and influential. See squatter2b
[C19: from squatter + -cracy]
References in periodicals archive ?
Where once upon a time the centralised industrial relations system, the power of unions, and the Labor Party were the instruments of rent transfer to lower and middle classes through high wages and full employment in the post-war decades, in recent times the erosion of unions, destruction of the IR system, and the rise of the new squattocracy (mining corporations) has exacerbated inequality of power and income.
As Kinsella writes, "The displacement and relocation of class conflict led by the squattocracy and selectors of the early to mid-nineteenth century meant a disruption of the pastoral 'high' and 'low' dramatizations" (136).
By 1869, however, land was more freely available and the power and influence of the squattocracy was diminished.
In Australia, squatters were large landholders and, like the large plantation owners of the Old South, a kind of aristocracy, referred to as the squattocracy.
The squattocracy is gone--what we have are blue collar workers.
In Melbourne the appreciation of the country houses of England signalled how after Federation the Victorian squattocracy and the Melbourne middle class, to assume 'an upper class ease', embraced English models and precedents.
in order that we can function as a group, as a squattocracy, as a community" (Episode 8).
For the next seven years, while Jack rode the wallaby track alone, she based herself with friends in Bathurst and cultivated the local squattocracy.
As social constructs they were more inclusive with more fluid boundaries, offering a more suitable frame of reference through which the colony's middle and working classes could stand against the 'aristocratic' squattocracy and British placemen of the colonial administration.
Even after the transportation system ended, and Australia's image as prison was succeeded by a subsequent role as gold-rush nirvana (which produced the populist protest of the Eureka Stockade, the strike by gold-miners considered the Aussie equivalent of the Boston Tea Party) and flourishing squattocracy (as depicted in the Australian-set works of Anthony Trollope) tropes of imprisonment still pervaded Australian cultural representation.
But despite a passion for roo poo, our doughty dung beetle turned up its nose, so to speak, at the wetter offerings of the European ruminants imported by Australia's squattocracy.
It was also the year Miles Franklin returned to print in her extraordinary guise as Brent of Bin Bin with her novel Up the Country: A Tale of Early Australian Squattocracy, and the year of the emergence of the collaborators Marjorie Barnard and Flora Eldershaw with their first book.