squaw


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squaw

 (skwô)
n.
1. Offensive A Native American woman, especially a wife.
2. Offensive Slang A woman or wife.

[Massachusett squa, younger woman.]

squaw

(skwɔː)
n
1. (Peoples) offensive a North American Indian woman
2. slang usually facetious a woman or wife
[C17: of Algonquian origin; compare Natick squa female creature]

squaw


(skwô),
n.
usage: Definition 1, though rarely used today, is perceived as insulting to Native Americans. Definitions 2a and 2b are used with disparaging intent and perceived as insulting to women. The word is sometimes mistakenly thought to refer literally to the female genitals.
n.
1. Older Use: Offensive. (a term used to refer to an American Indian woman, esp. a wife.)
2. Slang: Disparaging and Offensive.
a. (a term used to refer to a wife.)
b. (a term used to refer to any woman or girl.)
[1625–35, Amer.; < Massachusett (E sp.) squa, ussqua woman, younger woman < Proto-Algonquian *eθkwe·wa]

squaw

An Algonquian word meaning woman, used, offensively, to mean a Native American woman.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.squaw - an American Indian womansquaw - an American Indian woman    
American Indian, Indian, Red Indian - a member of the race of people living in America when Europeans arrived
Translations

squaw

[skwɔː] Nindia f, piel roja f

squaw

n (neg!)Squaw f

squaw

[skwɔː] nsquaw f inv
References in classic literature ?
Large piles of brush lay scattered about the clearing, and a wary and aged squaw was occupied in firing as many as might serve to light the coming exhibition.
Just then the crafty squaw, who had taken the necessary precaution to fire the piles, made her way through the throng, and cleared a place for herself in front of the captive.
He had sojourned among various tribes, and perhaps left progeny among them all; but his regular, or habitual wife, was a Sioux squaw.
Hunt consented to take his squaw and two children on board also.
An' you got a squaw that is some squaw, take it from me.
It was worth more, in some strange way, then a dozen pieces of meat from the hand of a squaw.
He had to forage for himself, and he foraged well, though he was oft-times a plague to the squaws in consequence.
The land was growing rougher; I was told that we were approaching Squaw Creek, which cut up the west half of the Shimerdas' place and made the land of little value for farming.
We raced off toward Squaw Creek and did not stop until the ground itself stopped-- fell away before us so abruptly that the next step would have been out into the tree-tops.
These, I was told, were children of the trappers; pledges of love from their squaw spouses in the wilderness.
Here, also, the savage tribes connected with the trade, the Nez Perces or Chopunnish Indians, and Flatheads, had pitched their lodges beside the streams, and with their squaws, awaited the distribution of goods and finery.
Look at these hags of squaws, friend Doctor; I have no judgment in savage tempers, if they are not bloody minded, and ready to work their accursed pleasures on us all.