squawfish


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squaw·fish

 (skwô′fĭsh′)
n. pl. squawfish or squaw·fish·es
A pikeminnow.

squawfish

(ˈskwɔːˌfɪʃ)
n
(Animals) old-fashioned any of several types of predatory N American fish (genus Ptychocheilus) of the carp family, with elongated bodies

squaw•fish

(ˈskwɔˌfɪʃ)

n., pl. (esp. collectively) -fish, (esp. for kinds or species) -fish•es.
any large, slender cyprinid fish of the genus Ptychocheilus, of W North America.
[1880–85, Amer.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Burley & Vigg (1989), with coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum, 1792) and northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonensis (Richardson, 1836), using their method based on a maximum expansion of the stomach which consisted of filling the stomach with air under pressure provided by a cylinder of gas.
Environmental factors affect daily increment de position and otolith growth in young Colorado squawfish. Trans.
Long-term retention of implanted transmitters in Colorado squawfish and razorback sucker.
Status of Colorado squawfish and razorback sucker in the San Juan River, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah.
He was fishing for squawfish otherwise known by its new politically correct name, the northern pikeminnow.
In the early 1990s, however, Dexter Lake's large population of northern squawfish (as pikeminnows were then known) was seen as competition for the rainbow trout fishery Lowell officials wanted to see developed in the lake.
Changes in habitat and microhabitat partitioning within an assemblage of stream fishes in response to predation by Sacramento squawfish (Ptychocheilus grandis).
The Nez Perces developed a complex fishing technology to harvest species of chinook, coho, chum, and sockeye salmon; cutthroat, lake, dolly varden, and steelhead trout; and different varieties of whitefish, sturgeon, suckers, lampreys, and squawfish. Data from ethnographic and archaeological records suggest upper estimates of individual Nez Perce average per capita consumption offish at roughly five hundred pounds per year.