asthma

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asthma
left: inflamed bronchial tube with contracted muscles and mucus discharge
right: normal bronchial tube

asth·ma

 (ăz′mə, ăs′-)
n.
A chronic inflammatory disease of the lungs characterized by a narrowing of the airways and attacks of wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath that are induced by triggers such as allergens, exercise, infections, and stress.

[Middle English asma, from Medieval Latin, from Greek asthma.]

asth·mat′ic (-măt′ĭk) adj. & n.
asth·mat′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

asthma

(ˈæsmə)
n
(Pathology) a respiratory disorder, often of allergic origin, characterized by difficulty in breathing, wheezing, and a sense of constriction in the chest
[C14: from Greek: laborious breathing, from azein to breathe hard]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

asth•ma

(ˈæz mə, ˈæs-)

n.
a paroxysmal, often allergic disorder of respiration characterized by bronchospasm, wheezing, and difficulty in expiration. Also called bronchial asthma.
[1350–1400; Middle English asma < Medieval Latin < Greek ásthma panting, asthma]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

asth·ma

(ăz′mə)
A chronic disease characterized by a narrowing of the airways that is often caused by an allergy. It results in attacks of wheezing, coughing, difficulty in breathing, and tightness of the chest.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

asthma


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A condition involving narrowing of the bronchioles (small airways in the lungs). This leads to recurrent attacks of breathlessness. Often these are triggered by an allergic reaction, but in some cases the cause is not known.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.asthma - respiratory disorder characterized by wheezingasthma - respiratory disorder characterized by wheezing; usually of allergic origin
bronchospasm - a spasm of the bronchi that makes exhalation difficult and noisy; associated with asthma and bronchitis
respiratory disease, respiratory disorder, respiratory illness - a disease affecting the respiratory system
status asthmaticus - a prolonged and severe asthma attack that does not respond to standard treatment
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
الربْورَبْـو ، أسَـمـه
астмазадух
astma
astma
astma
astma
asztma
asma, andarteppa
喘息
천식
asthma
astmaastminis
astma
astmă
záduch
astma
โรคหืด
astımastma
астма
bệnh hen

asthma

[ˈæsmə] Nasma m or f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

asthma

[ˈæsmə] nasthme m
I've got asthma → J'ai de l'asthme.
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

asthma

nAsthma nt; asthma attackAsthmaanfall m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

asthma

[ˈæsmə] nasma
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

asthma

(ˈӕsmə) , ((American) ˈӕzmə) noun
an illness which causes difficulty in breathing out, resulting from an allergy etc.
asthmatic (ӕsˈmatik) , ((American) ӕz-) adjective
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

asthma

الربْو astma astma Asthma άσθμα asma astma asthme astma asma 喘息 천식 astma astma astma asma астма astma โรคหืด astım bệnh hen 哮喘
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

asth·ma

[MIM*600807]
n. asma, condición alérgica con ataques de coriza y falta de respiración a causa de la infl. de las membranas mucosas;
cardiac ______ cardíaca.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

asthma

n asma
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
concluded that the management of stable asthma with ICS alone is incomplete; and that adding LTRAs complement the effect of controlling inflammation; hence, significantly improving QOL.10 Similarly in another recent randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled trial with acute asthmatic exacerbations, the treatment group received oral montelukast (10 mg, OD) for 2 weeks along with the standard therapy according to GINA guidelines.
Stepping therapy down in patients with well-controlled stable asthma should be considered to achieve optimal treatment with minimal side effects.
This phase 1/1b study is being conducted in healthy subjects and patients with mild to moderate stable asthma. The study will include single ascending dose and multiple ascending dose arms in normal healthy volunteers to assess safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics.
The respondents were selected from pharmacies that have a stable asthma patient flow.
Regular treatment with long acting beta agonists versus daily regular treatment with short acting beta agonists in adults and children with stable asthma. Cochrane Database Syst Rev.
To understand the role of lower airway dysbiosis in the pathogenesis of asthma, in this article, we review the published reports about the lung microbiome in both healthy subjects and those with stable asthma in the absence of infection.
Spirometric parameters were similar before and 3 weeks after stopping long-acting beta-agonist (LABA) therapy in an observational study of 58 patients who had stable asthma and were being treated with an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and a LABA.
Several studies showed higher 8-isoprostane levels in the sputum of patients with stable asthma [41], COPD [42, 43], or bronchiectasis [41] compared to healthy controls.
(2) The cost-effectiveness evidence favors MDIs (Or the cheapest inhaler device) as first-line treatment in all patients with stable asthma unless other specific reasons are identified.
Results: Sixty-six patients having stable asthma (n = 36), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 19), or interstitial lung disease (n = 11) participated in the study.
All participants had stable asthma controller therapy for 2 weeks or longer and had a predicted FEV1 of >50% at the start of the trial.
Asthma prevalence did not increase significantly over this time period, consistent with evidence suggesting relatively stable asthma rates in the United States since the late 1990s (Moorman et al.