staccatissimo


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staccatissimo

(ˌstækɑːˈtɪsɪˌməʊ) music
adv
(Classical Music) in a very staccato manner
adj
(Classical Music) (of a piece of music) to be played in a very staccato manner
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
8), the editor advises, "Use no pedal at all," as Kabalevsky specified, "staccatissimo."
What is important for students to understand regarding style is fourfold: 1) the creation of it, and done so through articulation (i.e., legato, portato, staccato, staccatissimo, accent, marcato, tenuto, tie, slur, etc.), 2) the aural identification and verbal description, 3) the performance execution to match each other within the ensemble, and 4) another means to enhance musical expression.
Concern Comment (i.e., dynamics, tempo, text) First Movement 4 Articulations Left hand staccatissimo? 12 + 7 Pitches Altos sing a B- natural; score seems to indicate a C- natural?
"I can play like a violin, legatissimo; I can play like a flute, staccatissimo; I can play pianissimo to the point where it is barely a sensation.
The increasingly frequent inclusion of words such as ~staccato, staccatissimo,' ~leggiero, ~marcato' in addition to articulation marks testifies to 19th-century composers' concern to clarify their intentions.
This especially sharp, high, and powerful attack is brought about by the following instruments: three piccolos staccatissimo, xylophone, glockenspiel, whip, a very high-pitched snare drum, celesta, harp, harpsichord, piano - these last four instruments playing very high tone clusters - and finally strings, which play a special, particularly penetrating pizzicato in which the string is pressed against the fingerboard with the fingernail.