staccato

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stac·ca·to

 (stə-kä′tō)
adj.
1. Music Cut short crisply; detached: staccato octaves.
2. Marked by or composed of abrupt, disconnected parts or sounds: staccato applause.
n. pl. stac·ca·tos or stac·ca·ti (-tē)
A staccato manner or sound.

[Italian, past participle of staccare, to detach, short for distaccare, from obsolete French destacher, from Old French destachier; see detach.]

stac·ca′to adv.

staccato

(stəˈkɑːtəʊ)
adj
1. (Classical Music) music (of notes) short, clipped, and separate
2. characterized by short abrupt sounds, as in speech: a staccato command.
adv
(Classical Music) (esp used as a musical direction) in a staccato manner
[C18: from Italian, from staccare to detach, shortened from distaccare]

stac•ca•to

(stəˈkɑ toʊ)

adj., adv., n., pl. -tos, -ti (-tē). adj.
1.
a. shortened and detached when played or sung: staccato notes.
b. characterized by performance in which the notes are abruptly disconnected: a staccato style of playing. Compare legato.
2. composed of or characterized by abruptly disconnected elements; disjointed: rapid-fire, staccato speech.
adv.
3. in a staccato manner.
n.
4. something done or performed in a staccato manner.
[1715–25; < Italian: disconnected, past participle of staccare to detach]

staccato

sharp and separated, not flowing
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.staccato - (music) marked by or composed of disconnected parts or sounds; cut short crisply; "staccato applause"; "a staccato command"; "staccato notes"
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
legato, smooth - (music) without breaks between notes; smooth and connected; "a legato passage"
Adv.1.staccato - separating the notes; in music; "play this staccato, please"
legato - connecting the notes; in music; "play this legato, please"
Translations

staccato

[stəˈkɑːtəʊ]
A. ADVstaccato
B. ADJstaccato

staccato

[stəˈkɑːtəʊ]
advstaccato
adj
(MUSIC)piqué(e)
[noise, voice] → saccadé(e)

staccato

adj, adv (Mus) → staccato, stakkato; (fig)abgehackt

staccato

[stəˈkɑːtəʊ] (Mus)
1. advin staccato
2. adjstaccato/a; (sound) → scandito/a
References in classic literature ?
While still in the anteroom Prince Andrew heard loud voices and a ringing staccato laugh- a laugh such as one hears on the stage.
She was a little frightened, not only by his thoughts, but by his staccato way of expressing them.
What he said we could not hear for the deep-drawn blast and the high staccato crackle of the blazing hold.
As he stood thus, peering out into the darkness of the cloud-enshrouded night, there came to him from across the water, like a slap in the face, so sudden and unexpected was it, the sharp staccato of an exchange of shots and then the scream of a woman.
A series of staccato taps on the west window brought Anne flying in from the yard, eyes shining, cheeks faintly flushed with pink, unbraided hair streaming behind her in a torrent of brightness.
As if too hot for her lips, she filled her saucer with the greasy-looking, nondescript fluid, and continued her set glare, her breast rising and falling with staccato, mechanical movement.
the lady was saying in a sighing staccato as Archer came in.