staffage


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staffage

(ˈstɑːfɪdʒ)
n
all of the additional figures, animals and other items of ornamentation in a painted scene or landscape, as distinct from the main figures or elements of the composition
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
1615-30, shattered rock, charred stumps, or rotting trees glow in varying gray or blue darkness, submerging or highlighting faceless, wandering human staffage.
Clearly Bloomfield was not prepared to abstract away from landscape the people who worked there or banish them as staffage.
These objects were the staffage of my life', declared Trude Ament-Resink (1914-2002) recalling growing up in Yogyakarta in a colonial house full of artefacts collected by her mother Anna Resink-Wilkens (1880-1945) between 1910 and 1940.
es lohnt sich fur den Schriftsteller nicht, sich sein Problem so zu vereinfachen, dass der riesige, komplizierte, tatsachliche Lebensprozess der Menschen im Zeitalter des Endkampfs der burgerlichen mit der proletarischen Klasse als "Fabel," Staffage, Hintergrund fur die Gestaltung grosser Individuen "verwendet" werden soll.
The third important category of staffage comprises the figures who, while in the picture, look at the landscape.
But this staffage is only the beginning of Altdorfer's sublime war games.
Pratt suggests that characteristic forms of illustration accompanied these modes: in the informational mode the landscape is the subject, not the describer, although small figures may be included as staffage.
The leading and supporting actors, the countless extras and staffage, not excluding the occasional monkey and leopard, are all resplendent in jewels, brocades, feathers, and turbans.
It first discusses the role of staffage in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century landscape aesthetics.
kind of staffage for the action, changed into living people.
He positions the rustic landscape representation "somewhere between the carefully wrought order of the formal garden and the forest or other wildness untouched by human presence" (xxiv): prosaic in its scenery and staffage, it is recognizably Netherlandish though not necessarily topographic.
Like staffage in nineteenth-century landscape painting, her observers direct our attention time and time again to the collective gaze and to the spectacles luring that gaze: Lily Daw displaying a zinnia in her mouth; sideshow attractions like the Petrified Man and Keela the Indian Maiden; a deaf couple animatedly discussing in sign language their miraculous discovery of a key; "loud, squirming, ill-assorted" bathers at a park; Clytie Farr and Mrs.