staffrider


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staffrider

(ˈstɑːfˌraɪdə)
n
a person who illegally rides on the outside of a suburban train
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
As Zimbler notes, the Ravan Press edition of Foe, part of a book series funded by the same Staffrider magazine whose urban Marxist outlook provided a powerful forum for young black writers to chronicle the daily experience of apartheid, placed the book squarely alongside explicitly political black South African output.
"The Poetry of Mafika Gwala." Staffrider 10 (1992): 43-51.
(39.) Desiree Lewis, "The Politics of Feminism in South Africa," Staffrider 10, no.
The latter as well as other cultural bodies reached out to diverse publics across South Africa and beyond, including the magazine Staffrider, and later the Centre for Documentary Photography at the University of Cape Town when Badsha and his family moved from Durban in the mid-1980s.
It assesses first the censors, publishers and writers; and then looks at six case studies that focus on Nadine Gordimer, Es'kia Mphahlele, Breyten Breytenbach and Etienne Leroux, BLAC books, J M Coetzee, and the Staffrider series.
Richard Rive, "Books by Black Writers," Staffrider 5,
As Frank Meintjies and Mi Hlastshwayo (1989) argued in Staffrider, "worker culture" expressed the "union's anti hierarchical position thus recognizing the importance of every worker's experience." They insisted that worker's self-understanding was a gird against the ruling class "determin[ing] our thinking and actions" (p.
Gordimer herself in an unflinching review of Life & Times of Michael K in the New York Review of Books critically speaks of Coetzee's fictional "revulsion against all political and revolutionary solutions."(12) Although her works have more psychological depth than most of the Staffrider school as she attempts to embody in her characters the social forces of her current historical situation, Gordimer repeatedly has affirmed that "the essential gesture" of the novelist is to be socially responsible by accurately depicting the truth of historical reality.
However, only one person managed to come - Chris van Wyk, then the editor of Staffrider magazine.
His stories had appeared in Staffrider Magazine since the late 1970s.
In the 186 New York production as part of a festival of black South African plays, Gangsters was cast with the actress Nomathemba Nomvume Mdini in the role of Rasechaba, now named Masechaba, "mother [not father] of the nation." (There is a poem, "Masechaba," by the Black Consciousness poet Ilva Mackay, in an issue of Staffrider devoted to commemorating "Women's Day," the great protest rally of women in Pretoria on August 9, 1956: its theme is Africa as political mother of political children).(31) Maponya said of its casting change that "women have long symbolized the strength of our movement, refusing to break under the yoke of oppression and sacrificing their very lives for the liberation.