stage direction

(redirected from stage directions)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

stage direction

n
(Theatre) an instruction to an actor or director, written into the script of a play
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stage direction - an instruction written as part of the script of a playstage direction - an instruction written as part of the script of a play
instruction, direction - a message describing how something is to be done; "he gave directions faster than she could follow them"
drama, dramatic play, play - a dramatic work intended for performance by actors on a stage; "he wrote several plays but only one was produced on Broadway"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
إرشاد مَسْرَحي، إخْراج
scénická poznámka
regibemærkning
színpadi utasítás
fyrirmæli um sviîsetningu
scénická poznámka
sahne açıklaması

stage direction

n (in text) → didascalie fpl
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

stage1

(steidʒ) noun
a raised platform especially for performing or acting on, eg in a theatre.
verb
1. to prepare and produce (a play etc) in a theatre etc. This play was first staged in 1928.
2. to organize (an event etc). The protesters are planning to stage a demonstration.
ˈstaging noun
1. wooden planks etc forming a platform.
2. the way in which a play etc is presented on a stage. The staging was good, but the acting poor.
stage direction
an order to an actor playing a part to do this or that. a stage direction to enter from the left.
stage fright
the nervousness felt by an actor etc when in front of an audience, especially for the first time. The young actress was suffering from stage fright and could not utter a word.
ˈstagehand noun
a workman employed to help with scenery etc.
stage manager
a person who is in charge of scenery and equipment for plays etc.
ˈstagestruck adjective
fascinated with the theatre or having a great desire to become an actor/actress.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
"Here Herod rages on the pageant and in the street also" is one stage direction. The devils, too, often ran among the people, partly to amuse them and partly to frighten and show them what might happen if they remained wicked.
Skidder's door as he was red-inking a stage direction for Myrtle Delorme (Miss Leeson) in his (unaccepted) comedy, to "pirouette across stage from L to the side of the Count." Up the carpeted ladder she crawled at last and opened the door of the skylight room.
'And this,' said the lady, crossing to Smike, as tragic actresses cross when they obey a stage direction, 'and this is the other.
The three stage directions just quoted were revised to read as follows: `Enter Brachiano, Florence disguised like Mulinassa: Lodovico, Antonelli, Gaspar, bearing their swords and helmets' ([I1.sup.r]; `Enter Hort.' ([I3.sup.v]; and `Enter Lod.
According to the stage directions, they must fall down to the ground when speaking after every rigorous motion they perform.
The monumental work, written mostly in blank verse with some scenes, descriptive connecting sequences, and stage directions written in prose, depicts the career of Napoleon Bonaparte from 1805 until his defeat at Waterloo in 1815.
It also has a cast list and stage directions. However, a play may also have another referencing scheme which is based on pages within a printed edition.
The notes also explore some of the key textual issues (such as differences between Q1 and Q2 or other editors' decisions, placement or insertion of stage directions, and inconsistency in speech prefixes), as well as discussing the stage action, both as it might manifest itself upon the early modern stage and with reference to specific realizations in the play's theatre history.
Rather than the five scaffolds depicted on the perimeter of the performance space in Perseverance, there are nineteen locations mentioned in the stage directions of the Mary Magdalene and another five mentioned either directly or obliquely in character speeches.
This collection of a dozen essays organized in five sections looks at early modern stage directions from a variety of angles.
Playwright Shahid Nadeem read the stage directions.