stagecoach


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stage·coach

 (stāj′kōch′)
n.
A four-wheeled horse-drawn vehicle formerly used to transport mail and passengers over a regular route.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stagecoach

(ˈsteɪdʒˌkəʊtʃ)
n
(Automotive Engineering) a large four-wheeled horse-drawn vehicle formerly used to carry passengers, mail, etc, on a regular route between towns and cities
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

stage•coach

(ˈsteɪdʒˌkoʊtʃ)

n.
a horse-drawn coach that formerly traveled over a fixed route with passengers, parcels, etc.
[1630–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stagecoach - a large coach-and-four formerly used to carry passengers and mail on regular routes between towns; "we went out of town together by stage about ten or twelve miles"
coach-and-four, four-in-hand, coach - a carriage pulled by four horses with one driver
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
عَرَبَة البَريد
dostavník
diligence
postakocsi
dostavník

stagecoach

[ˈsteɪdʒkəʊtʃ] Ndiligencia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

stagecoach

stage-coach [ˈsteɪdʒkəʊtʃ] ndiligence fstage direction nindication f scéniquestage door nentrée f des artistesstage fright ntrac m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

stagecoach

[ˈsteɪdʒˌkəʊtʃ] ndiligenza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

stage2

(steidʒ) noun
1. a period or step in the development of something. The plan is in its early stages; At this stage, we don't know how many survivors there are.
2. part of a journey. The first stage of our journey will be the flight to Singapore.
3. a section of a bus route.
4. a section of a rocket.
ˈstagecoach noun
a closed vehicle pulled by horses that travelled in former times along a regular route and carried passengers and mail.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
They fly quickly over the snow in their sledges; the motion is pleasant, and, in my opinion, far more agreeable than that of an English stagecoach. The cold is not excessive, if you are wrapped in furs--a dress which I have already adopted, for there is a great difference between walking the deck and remaining seated motionless for hours, when no exercise prevents the blood from actually freezing in your veins.
Once I crossed the plains and deserts and mountains of the West in a stagecoach, from the Missouri line to California, and since then all my pleasure trips must be measured to that rare holiday frolic.
Everyone- the stagecoach driver, the post-house overseers, the peasants on the roads and in the villages- had a new significance for him.
The introduction of the steam railway and the steamship, at the beginning of the period, in place of the lumbering stagecoach and the sailing vessel, broke up the old stagnant and stationary habits of life and increased the amount of travel at least a thousand times.
This small staff was quite equal to all the requirements, for a canal between Beaucaire and Aiguemortes had revolutionized transportation by substituting boats for the cart and the stagecoach. And, as though to add to the daily misery which this prosperous canal inflicted on the unfortunate inn-keeper, whose utter ruin it was fast accomplishing, it was situated between the Rhone from which it had its source and the post-road it had depleted, not a hundred steps from the inn, of which we have given a brief but faithful description.
On that day week, amply provided with all necessaries, I left it, inside the stagecoach, for Reading.
"Many remembrances from Corsor.* That is a town that is just rising into importance; a lively town that has steam-boats and stagecoaches: formerly people called it ugly, but that is no longer true.
While incidents like these, arising out of drums and masquerades and parties at quadrille, were passing at the west end of the town, heavy stagecoaches and scarce heavier waggons were lumbering slowly towards the city, the coachmen, guard, and passengers, armed to the teeth, and the coach--a day or so perhaps behind its time, but that was nothing--despoiled by highwaymen; who made no scruple to attack, alone and single-handed, a whole caravan of goods and men, and sometimes shot a passenger or two, and were sometimes shot themselves, as the case might be.
This I did because I knew the Dutch gentlemen and their servants would be upon the road that day, either in the stagecoaches or riding post, and I did not know but the drunken fellow, or somebody else that might have seen me at Harwich, might see me again, and so I thought that in one day's stop they would be all gone by.
I WONDER if you've heard of Stagecoach? And no, I don't mean the classic John Wayne western.
STAGECOACH continues to demonstrate its commitment to supporting communities and businesses, with particular efforts made to support youngsters in the North East by improving access to summer programmes.