stairsteps

stair·step

 (stâr′stĕp′)
n.
1. A step in a staircase.
2. stairsteps A staircase.
3. One of a series of objects or items grouped progressively according to height.
tr. & intr.v. stair·stepped, stair·step·ping, stair·steps
To position or be positioned progressively according to height: images stairstepped on a computer screen; ledges stairstepping down a mountainside.

stairsteps

(ˈstɛəˌstɛps)
pl n
(Building) US a flight of steps
References in periodicals archive ?
HUNTING While much of Big Cypress National Preserve reopened by early October after Irma, the Stairsteps unit and some campgrounds remained closed due to high water and other damages and access issues.
Work Rows 1 and 2 of Stairsteps patt (see Stitch Guide) 10 times.
Working with the therapy caregivers to create an outdoor therapy program that augments the indoor ADL setting, Levi + Wong Design offered walking circuits weaved with everyday exterior conditions: a variety of outdoor pavement materials, combinations of gates and latches, mailboxes, inclines with handrails, stairsteps, and street curb ramps.
The music is a remake of "O-o-h Child," a 1970 song by the Five Stairsteps. The original felt too big, so Deutsch had Elias Arts re-record it.
In one fairly recent publication, for instance, the author could not tell the Devil's Stairsteps from Profile Rock, with a picture of one and the name of the other beneath it.
The ABC form, in contrast, slides that topmost layer over to one side so that the honeycombs climb like stairsteps.
Encores of Stolen Car and her cover of the Five Stairsteps soul track Ooh Child brings the evening to a close.
These terraces descend like stairsteps from the rim's crest to the crater floor, which is relatively broad and flat with some small peaks in the center.
The new councilor must live inside the Ward 3 boundaries - which encompasses Main Street from Sixth to 21st streets, including the mill pond area to the south and stairsteps to the north beyond Highway 126.
Ooh Child by The Five Stairsteps was played to mourners during the service last Saturday.
Raby, with her female descendents darkening "like stairsteps" with each generation, is racially darkened by the fire that burns her father's only son (it remains unknown whether her literally "yellow" and dying brother Henry is burned dead or alive), along with the loyal progeny that "Evangeline" identifies specifically as the "son." This "German shepherd," part of a series of parodically pure and certifiably pedigreed sons (shades of the young Thomas Sutpen in the defining episode of his life in Absalom, Absalom!), repeatedly flings himself at the blocked front door before leaping into the fire-consumed Sutpen mansion from the back.
She leaves behind her daughters, granddaughters, and great-granddaughters who "get darker each generation, like stairsteps kind of" (585), as if erasing the last traces of miscegenous activity and reinscribing the binaries of black and white.