stalactite

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sta·lac·tite

 (stə-lăk′tīt′, stăl′ək-)
n.
An icicle-shaped mineral deposit, usually calcite or aragonite, hanging from the roof of a cavern, formed from the dripping of mineral-rich water.

[New Latin stalactītēs, from Greek stalaktos, dripping, from stalassein, stalak-, to drip.]

sta·lac′ti·form′ adj.
stal′ac·tit′ic (stăl′ăk-tĭt′ĭk, stə-lăk′-) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stalactite

(ˈstæləkˌtaɪt)
n
(Geological Science) a cylindrical mass of calcium carbonate hanging from the roof of a limestone cave: formed by precipitation from continually dripping water. Compare stalagmite
[C17: from New Latin stalactites, from Greek stalaktos dripping, from stalassein to drip]
stalactic, staˈlactical, stalactital, stalactitic, ˌstalacˈtitical adj
stalactiform, less commonly stalactitiform adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sta•lac•tite

(stəˈlæk taɪt, ˈstæl əkˌtaɪt)

n.
a deposit, usu. of calcium carbonate, shaped like an icicle, hanging from the roof of a cave or the like, and formed by the dripping of percolating calcareous water.
[1670–80; < New Latin stalactites < Greek stalakt(ós) dripping (v. adj. of stalássein to drip) + New Latin -ites -ite1]
stal`ac•tit′ic (-ˈtɪt ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

sta·lac·tite

(stə-lăk′tīt′)
A cylindrical or conical mineral deposit projecting downward from the roof of a cave or cavern, formed by dripping water saturated with minerals. Stalactites form gradually as the minerals precipitate out of the saturated water. They usually consist of calcite, but can also consist of other minerals.
Usage If you find it hard to remember the difference between stalagmites and stalactites, you are not alone. Both words refer to mineral deposits that form in caves. The source of each word is the Greek word stalassein, which means "to drip." This is appropriate, since each kind of deposit is formed by the dripping of mineral-rich water within caves. The difference is in position and orientation. A stalactite is an icicle-shaped deposit that hangs from the roof of a cavern, and a stalagmite is a conical mineral deposit that extends up from the floor of a cavern. And what do you call it when a stalagmite and stalactite meet and form a column? What else but a stalacto-stalagmite!
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stalactite

A “stone icicle” formed on a cave ceiling from dissolved calcium carbonate deposited as dripping water evaporates.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stalactite - a cylinder of calcium carbonate hanging from the roof of a limestone cave
cave - a geological formation consisting of an underground enclosure with access from the surface of the ground or from the sea
cylinder - a surface generated by rotating a parallel line around a fixed line
dripstone - the form of calcium carbonate found in stalactites and stalagmites
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
stalaktit
stalaktit
StalaktitTropfstein
függõ cseppkõ
dropasteinn
stalaktitas
stalaktīts
stalaktit
sarkıtstalaktitdamla taş

stalactite

[ˈstæləktaɪt] Nestalactita f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

stalactite

[ˈstæləktaɪt] nstalactite f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

stalactite

nStalaktit m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

stalactite

[ˈstæləkˌtaɪt] nstalattite f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

stalactite

(ˈstӕləktait) , ((American) stəˈlӕktait) noun
a spike of limestone hanging from the roof of a cave etc formed by the dripping of water containing lime.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
The uvula, the stalagtite hanging from the back of the palate, is also almost always beefy and swollen, and often the back of the soft palate is red and spotted.
One of the approaches was similar to that of a stalagtite where a molecular chain grew in a controlled formation such as a fiber.
There was a beeping ball flying over our heads, and most of our children couldn't explain the difference between "satellite" and "stalagtite." In a near panic, the nation rushed out new science education programs.
After a short educational video, you are taken on a tram ride hundreds of feet below ground into a world of stalagmites, stalagtites, waterfalls and clear
Spectacular stalagmites and stalagtites plus Cheddar Man, Britain's oldest complete skeleton.
From stalagtites to chedis, and the city of Bangkock seems to offer an abundance of padogas, or chedis.
As stalagtites drip from the ceiling and stalagmites spring from the floor like limestone church organ pipes, it's impossible not to think these surreal rocks must have been conceived in the mind of some Dali-esque sculptor.
One day trip took us to Slovenia and the stunning Postojna caves with their breathtaking stalagmites and stalagtites.
A one-mile trip via electric tram inside the cave takes in its multitudes of stalagtites and stalagmites, subterranean streams and water-falls.
The walls of the said cave have interesting stalagtites. The opening of the cave being 5 m.
Huge stalactites and stalagtites offer an awesome spectacle as you descend into the bowels of the Earth.
The quality of the figures is uneven, and the editor should have caught such typographical errors as "stalagtites" (see page 181, stalactites or stalagmites?), yet these problems are minor.