stand pat


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stand

 (stănd)
v. stood (sto͝od), stand·ing, stands
v.intr.
1.
a. To rise to an upright position on the feet.
b. To assume or maintain an upright position as specified: stand straight; stand to one side.
2.
a. To maintain an upright position on the feet.
b. To maintain an upright or vertical position on a base or support: The urn stands on a pedestal.
c. To be placed or situated: The building stands at the corner.
3.
a. To remain stable, upright, or intact: The old school still stands.
b. To remain valid, effective, or unaltered: The agreement stands.
4. To be or show a specified figure or amount: The balance stands at $500.
5. To measure a specified height when in an upright position: stands six feet tall.
6. To take up or maintain a specified position, altitude, or course: He stands on his earlier offer. We will stand firm.
7. To be in a position of possible gain or loss: She stands to make a fortune.
8.
a. To be in a specified state or condition: I stand corrected. We stand in awe of the view.
b. To exist in a particular form: Send the message as it now stands.
9. To be at a specified level on a scale or in an amount: stands third in her class; stands high in reputation.
10.
a. To come to a stop; remain motionless.
b. To remain stationary or inactive: The car stood in the garage all winter.
11. To remain without flowing or being disturbed; be or become stagnant.
12. Nautical To take or hold a particular course or direction: a ship standing to windward.
13. To be available as a sire. Used of horses.
14. Chiefly British To be a candidate for public office.
v.tr.
1. To cause to stand; place upright.
2. To engage in or encounter: stand battle.
3.
a. To resist successfully; withstand: stand the test of time; will not stand close examination.
b. To put up with patiently or resolutely; bear: can't stand the heat. See Synonyms at endure.
4. To submit to or undergo: stand trial.
5. To tolerate and benefit from: I could stand a good night's sleep.
6. To perform the duty of: stand guard.
7. Informal To treat (someone) or pay the cost of (food or drink): She stood him to a drink. We'll stand dinner.
n.
1. The act of standing.
2. A ceasing of work or activity; a standstill or halt.
3. A stop on a performance tour.
4. The place or station where a person stands.
5. A booth, stall, or counter for the display of goods for sale.
6. A parking space reserved for taxis.
7. A desperate or decisive effort at defense or resistance, as in a battle: made their stand at the river.
8. A position or opinion one is prepared to uphold: must take a stand on environmental issues.
9. stands Rows of wooden or metal benches placed one above another for people watching a sports event or a performance.
10. Law A witness stand.
11. A small rack, prop, or table for holding any of various articles: a music stand; a bedside stand.
12. A group or growth of tall plants or trees: a stand of pine.
Phrasal Verbs:
stand by
1. To be ready or available to act.
2. To wait for something, such as a broadcast, to resume.
3. To remain uninvolved; refrain from acting: stood by and let him get away.
4. To remain loyal to; aid or support: stands by her friends.
5. To keep or maintain: stood by her decision.
stand down
1. Law To leave a witness stand.
2. To withdraw, as from a political contest.
3. To end a state of readiness or alert.
4. To go off duty.
stand for
1. To represent; symbolize.
2. To advocate or support: stands for freedom of the press.
3. To put up with; tolerate: We will not stand for impertinent behavior.
stand in
To act as a stand-in.
stand off
1. To stay at a distance; remain apart or aloof.
2. To put off; evade.
3. Nautical To maintain a course away from shore.
stand on
1. To be based on; depend on: The success of the project stands on management's support of it.
2. To insist on observance of: stand on ceremony; stand on one's rights.
stand out
1. To protrude; project.
2. To be conspicuous, distinctive, or prominent.
3. To refuse compliance or maintain opposition; hold out: stand out against a verdict.
4. Nautical To maintain a course away from shore.
stand over
1. To watch or supervise closely.
2. To hold over; postpone.
stand to
To take up positions for action.
stand up
1. To remain valid, sound, or durable: His claim will not stand up in court. Our old car has stood up well over time.
2. Informal To fail to keep a date with.
Idioms:
stand a chance
To have a chance, as of gaining or accomplishing something.
stand (one's) ground
1. To maintain one's position against an attack.
2. To refuse to compromise; be unyielding.
stand on (one's) head
Sports To make numerous sprawling or dramatic saves. Used of a goalie.
stand on (one's) own/two feet
To be independent and responsible for oneself.
stand pat
1. To oppose or resist change.
2. Games To play one's poker hand without drawing more cards.
stand to reason
To be consistent with reason: It stands to reason that if we leave late, we will arrive late.
stand up for
1. To side with; defend.
2. To stand up with.
stand up to
To confront fearlessly; face up to.
stand up with
To act as best man or maid of honor for (the groom or bride) at a wedding.

[Middle English standen, from Old English standan; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

stand′er n.

stand pat

vb (intr)
1. (Card Games) poker to refuse the right to change any of one's cards; keep one's hand unchanged
2. to resist change or remain unchanged
ˌstandˈpatter n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.stand pat - refuse to abandon one's opinion or belief
insist, take a firm stand - be emphatic or resolute and refuse to budge; "I must insist!"
hunker down - hold stubbornly to a position; "The wife hunkered down and the husband's resistance began to break down"
References in classic literature ?
Never mind warning me, Inspector: I'm ready to stand pat upon the truth.
We believe that the BSP will likely stand pat on its interest rate decision at its last meeting for the year on Dec.
In our view, the BSP will likely stand pat through the second half of 2017 as the current monetary policy settings are accommodative for the upturn in the fixed investment cycle, which appears to have further room to run,' JP Morgan economist Sin Beng Ong said in a research note issued on Sept.
RBI may choose to stand pat and see through the effect of the loose monetary policy which it practiced over the last 2 years," Kapoor noted.
A strengthening dollar in the wake of the US Federal Reserve's decision to stand pat on interest rates earlier this week also helped to knock sterling off its feet.
THE London market closed higher last night, cheering the Bank of England's decision to stand pat on rates after delivering a bumper stimulus package last month.
THE London market closed higher yesterday, cheering the Bank of England's decision to stand pat on rates after delivering a bumper stimulus package last month.
If households stand pat and maintain their total consumption when the kids leave, they will aim to keep that consumption level in retirement and will have less savings with which to do it.
In a survey conducted by Yonhap Infomax, the financial news arm of Yonhap News Agency, 11 out of 13 economists polled forecast the Bank of Korea (BOK) to stand pat on its key rate this month.
amp;nbsp;Although analysts and investors expect the Fed to stand pat on interest rates, they are watching the meeting for possible insights into future policy moves and assurance that the central bank will continue to support growth.
The central bank is expected to stand pat and not cut borrowing.
At a policy meeting in late January, the Bank of Japan decided to stand pat on its own bond-buying scheme, saying its monetary-easing blitz was winning the war on deflation.