stand-in

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stand-in

(stănd′ĭn′)
n.
1. One who substitutes for an actor while the lights and camera are adjusted or during hazardous action.
2. A substitute.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stand′-in`



n.
1. a substitute for a film or television performer during the preparation of lighting, etc.
2. any substitute.
[1930–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stand-in - someone who takes the place of another (as when things get dangerous or difficult)stand-in - someone who takes the place of another (as when things get dangerous or difficult); "the star had a stand-in for dangerous scenes"; "we need extra employees for summer fill-ins"
compeer, equal, peer, match - a person who is of equal standing with another in a group
locum, locum tenens - someone (physician or clergyman) who substitutes temporarily for another member of the same profession
stunt man, stunt woman, double - a stand-in for movie stars to perform dangerous stunts; "his first job in Hollywood was as a double for Clark Gable"
alternate, surrogate, replacement - someone who takes the place of another person
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

stand-in

noun substitute, deputy, replacement, reserve, surrogate, understudy, locum, stopgap He was a stand-in for my regular doctor.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

stand-in

noun
One that takes the place of another:
Informal: fill-in, pinch hitter, sub.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

stand-in

[ˈstændɪn] Nsustituto/a m/f (for por) (Cine) → doble mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

stand-in

n (Film, Theat) → Ersatz m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

stand-in

[ˈstændˌɪn] nsostituto/a (Cine) → controfigura
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

stand

(stӕnd) past tense, past participle stood (stud) verb
1. to be in an upright position, not sitting or lying. His leg was so painful that he could hardly stand; After the storm, few trees were left standing.
2. (often with up) to rise to the feet. He pushed back his chair and stood up; Some people like to stand (up) when the National Anthem is played.
3. to remain motionless. The train stood for an hour outside Newcastle.
4. to remain unchanged. This law still stands.
5. to be in or have a particular place. There is now a factory where our house once stood.
6. to be in a particular state, condition or situation. As matters stand, we can do nothing to help; How do you stand financially?
7. to accept or offer oneself for a particular position etc. He is standing as Parliamentary candidate for our district.
8. to put in a particular position, especially upright. He picked up the fallen chair and stood it beside the table.
9. to undergo or endure. He will stand (his) trial for murder; I can't stand her rudeness any longer.
10. to pay for (a meal etc) for (a person). Let me stand you a drink!
noun
1. a position or place in which to stand ready to fight etc, or an act of fighting etc. The guard took up his stand at the gate; I shall make a stand for what I believe is right.
2. an object, especially a piece of furniture, for holding or supporting something. a coat-stand; The sculpture had been removed from its stand for cleaning.
3. a stall where goods are displayed for sale or advertisement.
4. a large structure beside a football pitch, race course etc with rows of seats for spectators. The stand was crowded.
5. (American) a witness box in a law court.
take the stand
to come and sit in the witness box in order to testify. The witness was asked to take the stand.
ˈstanding adjective
permanent. The general's standing orders must be obeyed.
noun
1. time of lasting. an agreement of long standing.
2. rank or reputation. a diplomat of high standing.
ˈstand-byplural ˈstand-bys noun
1. readiness for action. Two fire-engines went directly to the fire, and a third was on stand-by (= ready to go if ordered).
2. something that can be used in an emergency etc. Fruit is a good stand-by when children get hungry between meals.
adjective
(of an airline passenger or ticket) costing or paying less than the usual fare, as the passenger does not book a seat for a particular flight, but waits for the first available seat.
adverb
travelling in this way. It costs a lot less to travel stand-by.
ˈstand-in noun
a person who takes someone else's job etc for a temporary period, especially in making films.
ˈstanding-room noun
space for standing only, not sitting. There was standing-room only on the bus.
make someone's hair stand on end
to frighten someone very greatly. The horrible scream made his hair stand on end.
stand aside
to move to one side or withdraw out of someone's way. He stood aside to let me pass.
stand back
to move backwards or away. A crowd gathered round the injured man, but a policeman ordered everyone to stand back.
stand by
1. to watch something happening without doing anything. I couldn't just stand by while he was hitting the child.
2. to be ready to act. The police are standing by in case of trouble.
3. to support; to stay loyal to. She stood by him throughout his trial.
stand down
to withdraw eg from a contest.
stand fast/firm
to refuse to yield.
stand for
1. to be a candidate for election to. He stood for Parliament.
2. to be an abbreviation for. HQ stands for Headquarters.
3. to represent. I like to think that our school stands for all that is best in education.
4. to tolerate. I won't stand for this sort of behaviour.
stand in
to take another person's place, job etc for a time. The leading actor was ill and another actor stood in for him.
stand on one's own (two) feet
to manage one's own affairs without help.
stand out
1. to be noticeable. She stood out as one of the prettiest girls in the school.
2. to go on resisting or to refuse to yield. The garrison stood out (against the besieging army) as long as possible.
stand over
to supervise closely. I have to stand over him to make him do his schoolwork.
stand up for
to support or defend. She stood up for him when the others bullied him.
stand up to
to show resistance to. He stood up to the bigger boys who tried to bully him; These chairs have stood up to very hard use.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
The statement called for forming a follow-up committee, that comprises representatives, to launch popular campaigns and hold symposiums, stand-ins and marches in addition to press campaigns through social media.
His latest series, The Planets (BBC2), sees him doing the usual - delivering mind-boggling facts straight to camera from far-flung places that are good stand-ins for actual celestial bodies.
Elizabeth Banks (as Lucy) is the only actor crossing over from film to game, outshining the inferior stand-ins taking over for favourite characters like Emmet and Batman, while what was hilarious in a scripted narrative isn't that funny inside interactive gameplay.
They had a beautiful huge model in luminous green of an elephant that played Dumbo's mom, Jumbo, and then they had multiple, multiple stand-ins for Dumbo," Farrell said.
Rothschild-centric conspiracy theories have often served as wink-wink stand-ins for complaints about secretive cabals of Jewish financiers.
Embedded in and animating the large painted works were LED screens with videos of facial features and limbs moving involuntarily, which Oursler made by hypnotizing stand-ins for the original abductees.
The sides meet in a 25th anniversary friendly on Tuesday, and Jensen said: "It is the biggest fairytale, given the size of our country and player pool - and with just a week's notice to play [as last-gasp stand-ins for Yugoslavia].
This is Jackson's first year at school, and the officers wanted to serve as stand-ins for the little boy's father, who could not be there to put his son's mind at ease.
On Radio 2 this August bank holiday, the majority of the regular daytime presenters are off, so licence-fee payers are left with stand-ins or a recorded show.
The actualist should not (as commonly believed) require stand-ins for every Lewisian individual.
Not an easy example to follow even if the basic idea is good, and pupils offer their pets as stand-ins.
And the birds struck closer to the target center on the plain bug stand-ins than on the iridescent ones, Pike reports in April's Biology Letters.