stanza


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Related to stanza: alliteration, repetition

stan·za

 (stăn′zə)
n.
One of the divisions of a poem, composed of two or more lines usually characterized by a common pattern of meter, rhyme, and number of lines.

[Italian; see stance.]

stan·za′ic (-zā′ĭk) adj.

stanza

(ˈstænzə)
n
1. (Poetry) prosody a fixed number of verse lines arranged in a definite metrical pattern, forming a unit of a poem
2. (Soccer) US and Austral a half or a quarter in a football match
[C16: from Italian: halting place, from Vulgar Latin stantia (unattested) station, from Latin stāre to stand]
ˈstanzaed adj
stanzaic adj

stan•za

(ˈstæn zə)

n., pl. -zas.
an arrangement of a certain number of lines, usu. four or more, sometimes having a fixed length, meter, or rhyme scheme, forming a division of a poem.
[1580–90; < Italian: room, station, stanza < Vulgar Latin *stantia; see stance]
stan•za′ic (-ˈzeɪ ɪk) adj.

stanza

a section of a poem containing a number of verses.
See also: Verse

stanza

A group of lines forming a regular metrical division within a poem.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stanza - a fixed number of lines of verse forming a unit of a poem
poem, verse form - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines
couplet - a stanza consisting of two successive lines of verse; usually rhymed
octave - a rhythmic group of eight lines of verse
sestet - a rhythmic group of six lines of verse
envoi, envoy - a brief stanza concluding certain forms of poetry
quatrain - a stanza of four lines
Spenserian stanza - a stanza with eight lines of iambic pentameter and a concluding Alexandrine with the rhyme pattern abab bcbc c; "the Spenserian stanza was introduced by Edmund Spenser in The Faerie Queene"
strophe - one section of a lyric poem or choral ode in classical Greek drama
antistrophe - the section of a choral ode answering a previous strophe in classical Greek drama; the second of two metrically corresponding sections in a poem
text, textual matter - the words of something written; "there were more than a thousand words of text"; "they handed out the printed text of the mayor's speech"; "he wants to reconstruct the original text"
line - text consisting of a row of words written across a page or computer screen; "the letter consisted of three short lines"; "there are six lines in every stanza"
rhyme royal - a stanza form having seven lines of iambic pentameter; introduced by Chaucer
ottava rima - a stanza of eight lines of heroic verse with the rhyme scheme abababcc
Translations
sloka
stih

stanza

[ˈstænzə] Nestrofa f, estancia f

stanza

[ˈstænzə] nstrophe f

stanza

nStrophe f

stanza

[ˈstænzə] nstanza (Poesia)
References in classic literature ?
Spenser invented for himself a new stanza of nine lines and made it famous, so that we call it after him, the Spenserian Stanza.
The Spencerian stanza, with its rich variety of movement and its harmonious closes, long shut "Childe Harold" from me, and whenever I found a poem in any book which did not rhyme its second line with its first I read it unwillingly or not at all.
THIS stanza from "The Raven" was recommended by James Russell Lowell as an inscription upon the Baltimore monument which marks the resting place of Edgar Allan Poe, the most interesting and original figure in American letters.
His genius has had no better description than in this stanza from William Winter's poem, read at the dedication exercises of the Actors' Monument to Poe, May 4, 1885, in New York:
As stanza after stanza of it thundered forth, he sat with his hands clasped, trembling in every nerve.
It may be asked further of poetry, whether the meter and stanza structure are appropriate to the mood and thought and so handled as to bring out the emotion effectively; and whether the sound is adapted to the sense (for example, musical where the idea is of peace or quiet beauty).
The pages of his mind were blank, and, without effort, much he read and liked, stanza by stanza, was impressed upon those pages, so that he was soon able to extract great joy from chanting aloud or under his breath the music and the beauty of the printed words he had read.
The bachelor replied that although he was not one of the famous poets of Spain, who were, they said, only three and a half, he would not fail to compose the required verses; though he saw a great difficulty in the task, as the letters which made up the name were seventeen; so, if he made four ballad stanzas of four lines each, there would be a letter over, and if he made them of five, what they called decimas or redondillas, there were three letters short; nevertheless he would try to drop a letter as well as he could, so that the name "Dulcinea del Toboso" might be got into four ballad stanzas.
Compare the following stanzas, from a kind of palinode, "1870-1871," years of the Franco-German war and the Parisian Commune:--
We have indeed picked out those stanzas from a quiet personal record of certain amorous hours of early youth in that quaint arctic land, Mr.
I wrote, I wrote everything--ponderous essays, scientific and sociological short stories, humorous verse, verse of all sorts from triolets and sonnets to blank verse tragedy and elephantine epics in Spenserian stanzas.
Billy sang a lugubrious song of many stanzas about a cowboy, the refrain of which was, "Bury me out on the lone pr-rairie.