star-nosed mole


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star-nosed mole

 (stär′nōzd′)
n.
A mole (Condylura cristata) of North America, having 22 small fleshy tentacles encircling the end of its nose in a starlike pattern.

star-nosed mole

or

starnose

n
(Animals) an E North American amphibious mole, Condylura cristata, having a ring of pink fleshy tentacles around the nose

star′-nosed`

(or star′nose) mole′,


n.
a North American mole, Condylura cristata, having a starlike ring of fleshy processes around the end of the snout.
Also called star′nose`.
[1820–30, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.star-nosed mole - amphibious mole of eastern North America having pink fleshy tentacles around the nosestar-nosed mole - amphibious mole of eastern North America having pink fleshy tentacles around the nose
mole - small velvety-furred burrowing mammal having small eyes and fossorial forefeet
References in periodicals archive ?
As a similar example, it is known that the star-nosed mole, Condylura cristata, which is distributed in North America has width variations, such as swollen conditions, in the tail (Hamilton 1931, Eadie & Hamilton 1956, Imaizumi & Obara 1966, Petersen & Yates 1980).
From a field guide, I was able to ID it as a star-nosed mole. At that moment, I decided to begin a new research project.
So check out the likes of the giant isopod, goblin shark, aye aye, Surinam toad, gob-faced squid and star-nosed mole to see if you agree with our ugly marks out of ten.
The star-nosed mole looks like something from a science-fiction movie.
The only exceptions appear to be the star-nosed mole (Condylura cristata) and the shrew-mole (Neurotrichus gibbsii) (Hartman and Yates, 2003).
"I've described it as the unlucky, stupid cousin of the star-nosed mole," he says.
The star-nosed mole, which sports a crown of fleshy tendrils round its snout, is nature's king of fast food.
is star-nosed mole is maybe dormouse sparrow or wren
He also examines hornets that construct electric central heating systems, and the star-nosed mole, whose home is designed to collect its preferred meal of worms.
He also examines hornets that construct electric central heating systems, and the star-nosed mole, whose dwelling is designed to collect its preferred meal of worms.
Here he investigates animals that build structures, including hornets that build electric central heating systems, and the star-nosed mole, whose dwelling is its larder.
Show those same people the star-nosed mole with wiggling tentacles sticking out of its face, and you'll most likely hear, "Ick!" But often the features we find unattractive in animals are actually adaptations, or characteristics that help an organism survive in its environment.