stasis

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sta·sis

 (stā′sĭs, stăs′ĭs)
n. pl. sta·ses (stā′sēz, stăs′ēz)
1. A condition of balance among various forces; motionlessness: "Language is a primary element of culture, and stasis in the arts is tantamount to death" (Charles Marsh).
2. Medicine Stoppage of the normal flow of a body substance, as of blood through an artery or of intestinal contents through the bowels.

[Greek, stationariness; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stasis

(ˈsteɪsɪs)
n
1. (Pathology) pathol a stagnation in the normal flow of bodily fluids, such as the blood or urine
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) literature a state or condition in which there is no action or progress; static situation: dramatic stasis.
[C18: via New Latin from Greek: a standing, from histanai to cause to stand; related to Latin stāre to stand]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sta•sis

(ˈsteɪ sɪs, ˈstæs ɪs)

n., pl. sta•ses (ˈsteɪ siz, ˈstæs iz)
1. the state of equilibrium or inactivity caused by opposing equal forces.
2. stagnation in the flow of any of the fluids of the body.
[1735–45; < Greek stásis < s. of histánai to make stand; see stand]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

stasis

- A period of inactivity or equilibrium, from Greek histanai, "stoppage."
See also related terms for stoppage.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

stasis

cessation in the flow of any of the bodily fluids, as the blood.
See also: Bodily Functions
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stasis - an abnormal state in which the normal flow of a liquid (such as blood) is slowed or stopped
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
2.stasis - inactivity resulting from a static balance between opposing forces
inaction, inactiveness, inactivity - the state of being inactive
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

stasis

noun
A stable state characterized by the cancellation of all forces by equal opposing forces:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

stasis

[ˈsteɪsɪs] Nestasis f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

stasis

nStauung f, → Stase f (spec); (Liter) → Stillstand m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

sta·sis

n. estasis, estancamiento de la circulación de un líquido, tal como la sangre y la orina, en una parte del cuerpo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

stasis

n estasis f, estancamiento; venous — estasis venosa, insuficiencia venosa; [Note: estasis is often treated as masculine, but the feminine form is consistent with its etymological roots and is the only form accepted by the RAE.]
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The stases help rhetors "choose among all things sayable about a debatable topic" (Prelli, 1989, p.
Hermogenes' on stases: A translation with an introduction and notes.
"Classical Systems of Stases in Greek: Hermagoras to Hermogenes." Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies, 2, 51-71.