stationer


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sta·tion·er

 (stā′shə-nər)
n.
1. One that sells stationery.
2. Archaic
a. A publisher.
b. A bookseller.

[Middle English staciouner, a bookseller, from Medieval Latin statiōnārius, shopkeeper (as against a peddler), probably from Latin statiō, statiōn-, place of business; see station.]

stationer

(ˈsteɪʃənə)
n
1. (Commerce) a person who sells stationery or a shop where stationery is sold
2. (Commerce) obsolete a publisher or bookseller
[C14: from Medieval Latin stationarius a person having a regular station, hence a shopkeeper (esp a bookseller) as distinguished from an itinerant tradesman; see station]

sta•tion•er

(ˈsteɪ ʃə nər)

n.
1. a seller of paper, pens, pencils, and other writing materials.
2. Archaic.
a. a bookseller.
b. a publisher.
[1350–1400; < Medieval Latin statiōnārius, n. use of the adj.: stationary]

stationer

- A bookseller who had a regular "station" or shop at a university, unlike most booksellers, who were itinerant vendors.
See also related terms for shop.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stationer - a merchant who sells writing materials and office supplies
merchandiser, merchant - a businessperson engaged in retail trade
Translations
بائِع الأدوات المَكْتَبِيَّه
-icepapírnictvípapírník
papirhandelpapirhandler
kirjoitustarvikkeita myyvä paperikauppa
papirnica
papírkereskedés
ritfangasali
文房具店
문구점
kanceliarinės prekėskanceliarinių prekių pardavėjas
rakstāmpiederumu tirgotājs
predavač v papiernictve
pappershandlare
ร้านขายเครื่องเขียน
cửa hàng văn phòng phẩm

stationer

[ˈsteɪʃənəʳ] Npapelero/a m/f
stationer's (shop)papelería f

stationer

[ˈsteɪʃənər] npapetier/ière m/f
stationer's, stationer's shop → papeterie f

stationer

nSchreibwarenhändler(in) m(f); stationer’s (shop)Schreibwarenhandlung f

stationer

[ˈsteɪʃnəʳ] ncartolaio/a
stationer's shop → cartoleria

stationer

(ˈsteiʃənə) noun
a person who sells stationery.
ˈstationery noun
paper, envelopes, pens and other articles used in writing etc.

stationer

مَكْتَبَةٌ لِبَيْعِ الأَدَوَاتِ الـمَكْتَبِيَّة papírnictví papirhandel Schreibwarenhandlung χαρτοπωλείο papelería kirjoitustarvikkeita myyvä paperikauppa papeterie papirnica cartoleria 文房具店 문구점 kantoorboekhandel bokhandel sklep papierniczy papelaria магазин канцтоваров pappershandlare ร้านขายเครื่องเขียน kırtasiyeci cửa hàng văn phòng phẩm 文具店
References in classic literature ?
Snagsby, law- stationer, pursues his lawful calling.
To Snagsby's, Law- Stationer's, Deeds engrossed and copied, Law-Writing executed in all its branches, &c., &c., &c.
Post-mark, 'Charing Cross.' Stationer's stamp cut off the inside of the envelope.
At last we passed a stationer's, and it occurred to me that I might as well buy some paper.
Weller should have paused before a small stationer's and print-seller's window; but without further explanation it does appear surprising that his eyes should have no sooner rested on certain pictures which were exposed for sale therein, than he gave a sudden start, smote his right leg with great vehemence, and exclaimed, with energy, 'if it hadn't been for this, I should ha' forgot all about it, till it was too late!'
'I should ha' forgot it; I should certainly ha' forgot it!' said Sam; so saying, he at once stepped into the stationer's shop, and requested to be served with a sheet of the best gilt-edged letter- paper, and a hard-nibbed pen which could be warranted not to splutter.
"In a stationer's shop in Pall Mall, where I had business.
The servant was sent at once to the nearest stationer's to borrow a Directory.
She buys a couple of begilt Bristol boards at the Fancy Stationer's and paints her very best upon them-- a shepherd with a red waistcoat on one, and a pink face smiling in the midst of a pencil landscape--a shepherdess on the other, crossing a little bridge, with a little dog, nicely shaded.
Why should a perfectly honest man--Well, well, here's a large stationer's.
In this manner they walked on, very amicably, until they arrived at Miss Knag's brother's, who was an ornamental stationer and small circulating library keeper, in a by-street off Tottenham Court Road; and who let out by the day, week, month, or year, the newest old novels, whereof the titles were displayed in pen-and-ink characters on a sheet of pasteboard, swinging at his door-post.
It was a street of dingy houses huddled together; many of the windows had been broken and were clumsily repaired with strips of French newspaper; the doors had not been painted for years; there were shabby little shops on the ground floor, laundries, cobblers, stationers. Ragged children played in the road, and an old barrel-organ was grinding out a vulgar tune.