statistic


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sta·tis·tic

 (stə-tĭs′tĭk)
n.
1. A numerical piece of information.
2. A calculated numerical value (such as the sample mean) that characterizes some aspect of a sample set of data, and that is often meant to estimate the true value of a corresponding parameter (such as the population mean) in an underlying population.
3. One viewed solely as a piece of statistical or numerical information: got laid off and became another statistic in the slumping economy.

[Ultimately from New Latin statisticus, of statecraft; see statistics.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

statistic

(stəˈtɪstɪk)
n
(Statistics) any function of a number of random variables, usually identically distributed, that may be used to estimate a population parameter. See also sampling statistic, estimator2, parameter3
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sta•tis•tic

(stəˈtɪs tɪk)

n.
a numerical fact or datum, esp. one computed from a sample.
[1875–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

statistic

- Comes from a German noun describing knowledge dealing with the constitutions and resources of the states of the world.
See also related terms for states.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.statistic - a datum that can be represented numerically
data point, datum - an item of factual information derived from measurement or research
statistics - a branch of applied mathematics concerned with the collection and interpretation of quantitative data and the use of probability theory to estimate population parameters
average, norm - a statistic describing the location of a distribution; "it set the norm for American homes"
demographic - a statistic characterizing human populations (or segments of human populations broken down by age or sex or income etc.)
deviation - the difference between an observed value and the expected value of a variable or function
moment - the n-th moment of a distribution is the expected value of the n-th power of the deviations from a fixed value
distribution free statistic, nonparametric statistic - a statistic computed without knowledge of the form or the parameters of the distribution from which observations are drawn
parametric statistic - any statistic computed by procedures that assume the data were drawn from a particular distribution
time series - a series of values of a variable at successive times
vital statistics - data relating to births and deaths and health and diseases and marriages
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

statistic

[stəˈtɪstɪk] Nestadística f, número m
see also statistics
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

statistic

[stəˈtɪstɪk] nstatistique f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

statistic

nStatistik f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

statistic

[stəˈtɪstɪk] nstatistica
see also statistics
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

statistic

n estadística (cifra); npl estadística (campo de las matemáticas)
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Our hearts can talk our heads down almost any time, and, best all, our hearts are always right despite the statistic that they are mostly wrong."
An absolute statistic of the per centage of suicides due to John Barleycorn would be appalling.
Before they died the brilliant one was detected in seventy languages as the author of but two or three books of fiction and poetry, while the other was honoured in the Bureau of Statistics of his native land as the compiler of sixteen volumes of tabulated information relating to the domestic hog.
Statistics show that he does NOT prefer to remain quiescent.
Statistics show that we lose more fools on this day than in all the other days of the year put together.
To these and similar statistics, they listened with profound attention, and apparently, implicit belief.
The skeleton dimensions I shall now proceed to set down are copied verbatim from my right arm, where I had them tattooed; as in my wild wanderings at that period, there was no other secure way of preserving such valuable statistics. But as I was crowded for space, and wished the other parts of my body to remain a blank page for a poem I was then composing --at least, what untattooed parts might remain --I did not trouble myself with the odd inches; nor, indeed, should inches at all enter into a congenial admeasurement of the whale.
Whereas now, in one moment of audition, I take as it were the census and statistics, local, corporeal, mental and spiritual, of every living being in Lineland.
The actions of men are subject to general immutable laws expressed in statistics. What is man's responsibility to society, the conception of which results from the conception of freedom?
These statistics, however accidental and therefore uninstructive they may appear, as they have a certain completeness, have a certain value also.
Sort of fruit not mentioned; their usual slovenliness in statistics.
I invented a name for the town, a code of laws for the inhabitants, productions, antiquities, chalybeate springs, population, statistics of crime, and so on, while I walked about the streets, looked in at the shop-windows, and attentively examined the Market-place and Town-hall.