staymaker

staymaker

(ˈsteɪˌmeɪkə)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a corset maker, a maker of stays
2. (Professions) a corset maker, a maker of stays
References in classic literature ?
Our mothers could neither of them exactly ascertain who were our Father, though it is generally beleived that Philander, is the son of one Philip Jones a Bricklayer and that my Father was one Gregory Staves a Staymaker of Edinburgh.
No sooner does the carriage turn out, all complete, than she turns into it, all complete, and gives the word 'To Lady Tippins's.' That charmer dwells over a staymaker's in the Belgravian Borders, with a life-size model in the window on the ground floor of a distinguished beauty in a blue petticoat, stay-lace in hand, looking over her shoulder at the town in innocent surprise.
The staymaker's wife went to fetch Lydgate, and he continued for a fortnight to attend Nancy in her own home, until under his treatment she got quite well and went to work again.
Young Jane had already done her parody of such attitudes in the presentation of Philander and Gustavus in "Love and Friendship." Though they are the offspring of a Bricklayer and a Staymaker, '"This is however of little consequence,"' says Gustavus, '"for as our Mothers were certainly never married to either of them, it reflects no Dishonour on our Blood which is of a most ancient & unpolluted kind'" (106-07).
Born in a small village in Norfolk Paine was apprenticed to his Quaker father's staymaker's shop, where he learned the trade of making women's corsets by inserting steel or whalebones into their fabric.
Hob, and the Quack-doctor 1 10 0 The Pluralist 0 15 0 The Staymaker 0 15 0 Doctor Stern, and Doctor Squintum 0 10 0 [pounds]3 10 0
Floor resembles the bon roots in "Love and Freindship," that earlier piece of absurdist comedy written at age fourteen, where, as Peter Sabor notes, she puns on the "staves" of a barrel as akin to the stays of a woman's corset with the character of"Gregory Staves a Staymaker" (Juvenilia 138, 443).
Born in a small village in Norfolk, Paine was apprenticed to his Quaker father's staymaker's shop, where he learned the trade of making women's corsets by inserting steel or whalebones into their fabric.
Simcox and Paterson encouraged women bookbinders, upholsteresses, shirtmakers, dressmakers, sewing machinists, tailoresses, hatmakers, umbrella-makers, nailmakers, staymakers, laundresses, and other women workers to form societies having the same objects as the unions of men, which had just been legalized in 1871.
Unique among the different areas of female entrepreneurship, women's garment making - dominated by dressmakers, staymakers and milliners, but also including straw hat makers and baby-linen makers - was an area of business that involved both skilled production and retail.