steady state

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steady state

n. Physics
A stable condition that does not change over time or in which change in one direction is continually balanced by change in another.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

steady state

n
(General Physics) physics the condition of a system when some or all of the quantities describing it are independent of time but not necessarily in thermodynamic or chemical equilibrium. See also equilibrium6
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

stead·y state

(stĕd′ē)
A stable condition that does not change over time or in which any one change is continually balanced by another.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In [14], a study for the detection of inter-turn faults on IM fed inverter, during the start-up transient and steady-state with the use of the FFT, the discrete wavelet transform (DWT), and Wavelet Packets Decomposition (WPD), is presented.
Nireos, a spin-off company of the physics department of Politecnico di Milano University, has introduced an ultra-stable interferometer, called Gemini, which is ideal for broadband SL steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy.
The charge-off performance of the Delamare pool has been stable and below Fitch's unchanged steady-state charge-off assumption of 5%.
Currently grid analysis tools were built primarily to model steady-state operations and are challenged by today's more dynamic power grid with its renewable energy sources and high-speed transmission.
CSHub researchers model the risk of fracture due to temperature changes and propose a method for estimating the risk of thermal cracking in transient-state conditions--when pavement is still undergoing a change in temperature--and steady-state conditions.
For steady-state responses, the amplitude [a.sub.n] and the new phase [[theta].sub.n] should be constants; thus,
However, as we only considered steady-state situations, all results and consequences still hold true.
The L3OM namely assures accurate results only in relative proximity of an initial steady-state. It is not certain if the obtained simulation results are accurate.
Figure 11 shows the steady-state population percent distribution by age a).

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