steak


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Related to steak: Steak Diane, steak sauce

steak

 (stāk)
n.
1. A slice of meat, typically beef, usually cut thick and across the muscle grain and served broiled or fried.
2. A thick slice of a large fish cut across the body.
3. A patty of ground meat broiled or fried.

[Middle English steike, from Old Norse steik; see steig- in Indo-European roots.]

steak

(steɪk)
n
1. (Cookery) See beefsteak
2. (Cookery) any of various cuts of beef of varying quality, used for braising, stewing, etc
3. (Cookery) a thick slice of pork, veal, etc, or of a large fish, esp cod or salmon
4. (Cookery) minced meat prepared in the same way as steak: hamburger steak.
[C15: from Old Norse steik roast; related to steikja to roast on a spit; see stick1]

steak

(steɪk)

n.
a slice of meat or fish, esp. beef, cooked by broiling, frying, or the like.
[1400–50; < Old Norse steik meat roasted on a spit]

steak

- Seems to be related to Old Norse steikja, "roast on a spit," and stikna, "be roasted."
See also related terms for roast.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.steak - a slice of meat cut from the fleshy part of an animal or large fishsteak - a slice of meat cut from the fleshy part of an animal or large fish
cut of meat, cut - a piece of meat that has been cut from an animal carcass
fish steak - cross-section slice of a large fish
beefsteak - a beef steak usually cooked by broiling
Translations
biftekfiléřízek
bøf=-bøf
pihvi
odrezak
hússzelet
kjötsneiî eîa fiskstykki til steikingar
ステーキ
스테이크
žuvies gabalas
gaļas/zivs gabals
mihnúť sa
zrezek
biffstek
เนื้อสเต็ก
miếng thịt bò nạc

steak

[steɪk]
A. N (= one piece) → filete m or bistec m de vaca, filete m or bistec m de res (LAm), bife m (Andes, S. Cone); (for stewing etc) → carne f de vaca or res; (= barbecued steak) → churrasco m (And, S. Cone)
B. CPD steak and kidney pie Npastel m de carne y riñones
steak house Nasador m
steak knife Ncuchillo m para la carne

steak

[ˈsteɪk] n
(= meat) → bifteck m, steak m
steak and chips → un steak frites
(= fish) → steak m
tuna steak → steak de thonsteak and kidney pie ntourte f à la viande de bœuf et aux rognonssteak and kidney pudding npudding m à la viande de bœuf et aux rognonssteak house steakhouse [ˈsteɪkhaʊs] ngrill-room msteak knife n [steak knives] (pl) → couteau m à viande

steak

nSteak nt; (of fish)Filet nt; a ham/bacon steakeine Scheibe gebackener Schinken/Speck; steak and kidney pieFleischpastete fmit Nieren; steak dinnerSteakmenü nt

steak

:
steakhouse
nSteakhouse nt
steak knife
nSteakmesser nt
steak tartare
nTatarbeefsteak nt

steak

[steɪk] n (beef) → carne f di manzo; (piece of beef, pork) → bistecca
a cod steak → un trancio di merluzzo
steak and kidney pie pasticcio di carne e rognoni di manzo in pasta sfoglia

steak

(steik) noun
a slice of meat (usually beef) or fish (often cod) for eg frying or stewing. a piece of steak; two cod steaks.

steak

شَرِيحَةُ لَـحْم biftek bøf Steak μπριζόλα bistec pihvi steak odrezak bistecca ステーキ 스테이크 biefstuk biff befsztyk bife бифштекс biff เนื้อสเต็ก biftek miếng thịt bò nạc 牛排

steak

n bistec m
References in classic literature ?
About midnight that steak was cut and cooked; and lighted by two lanterns of sperm oil, Stubb stoutly stood up to his spermaceti supper at the capstan-head, as if that capstan were a sideboard.
Last night I was up to the Glen and took home two pounds of steak.
He had been attracted by the Gallic look of the window, in which was generally an uncooked steak on one plate and on each side two dishes of raw vegetables.
He sat with his coat unbuttoned over a white waistcoat, resting both elbows on the table, and while waiting for the steak he had ordered he looked at a French novel that lay open on his plate.
So the sparrow perched upon the shelf: and having first looked carefully about her to see if anyone was watching her, she pecked and scratched at a steak that lay upon the edge of the shelf, till at last down it fell.
Nobs sat between the girl and me and was fed with morsels of the Plesiosaurus steak, at the risk of forever contaminating his manners.
This reminder brought in an exclusive steak for Mr Squeers, who speedily proceeded to do it ample justice.
When the chair was not in use, it reposed on top of the bed, though sometimes he sat on the chair when cooking, reading a book while the water boiled, and even becoming skilful enough to manage a paragraph or two while steak was frying.
As he wiped his hands he watched her keenly, and cried out with approbation as she dropped the steak in the fryin pan.
And here comes in the stout head waiter, puffing under a tray of hot viands--kidneys and a steak, transparent rashers and poached eggs, buttered toast and muffins, coffee and tea, all smoking hot.
At eight o'clock, the shelves being taken down and put away and the tables joined together, everybody sat down to the tea, coffee, bread, butter, salmon, shad, liver, steak, potatoes, pickles, ham, chops, black-puddings, and sausages, all over again.
Into one little chamber of this temple, he dropped an egg; into another some coffee; into a third a compact piece of raw steak from a neat tin case; into a fourth, he poured some water.