steamer


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steam·er

 (stē′mər)
n.
1. One that steams.
2. A steamship or steamboat.
3. A vehicle, machine, or engine driven by steam.
4. A container in which something is steamed.

steamer

(ˈstiːmə)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a boat or ship driven by steam-engines
2. (Mechanical Engineering) Also called: steam box an apparatus for steaming wooden beams and planks to make them pliable for shipbuilding
3. (Cookery) a vessel used to cook food by steam
4. (Team Sports, other than specified) slang Austral a clash of sporting teams characterized by rough play

steam•er

(ˈsti mər)

n.
1. something propelled or operated by steam, as a steamship.
2. one that steams.
3. a device, pot, or container in which something is steamed.
v.i.
5. to travel by steamship.
[1805–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.steamer - a clam that is usually steamed in the shellsteamer - a clam that is usually steamed in the shell
Mya arenaria, soft-shell clam, long-neck clam, steamer clam, steamer - an edible clam with thin oval-shaped shell found in coastal regions of the United States and Europe
clam - flesh of either hard-shell or soft-shell clams
2.steamer - a cooking utensil that can be used to cook food by steaming it
cooking utensil, cookware - a kitchen utensil made of material that does not melt easily; used for cooking
3.steamer - a ship powered by one or more steam enginessteamer - a ship powered by one or more steam engines
paddle steamer, paddle-wheeler - a steam vessel propelled by paddle wheels
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
steam engine - external-combustion engine in which heat is used to raise steam which either turns a turbine or forces a piston to move up and down in a cylinder
tramp steamer, tramp - a commercial steamer for hire; one having no regular schedule
4.steamer - an edible clam with thin oval-shaped shell found in coastal regions of the United States and Europesteamer - an edible clam with thin oval-shaped shell found in coastal regions of the United States and Europe
clam - burrowing marine mollusk living on sand or mud; the shell closes with viselike firmness
genus Mya, Mya - type genus of the family Myacidae
long-neck clam, soft-shell clam, steamer, steamer clam - a clam that is usually steamed in the shell
Verb1.steamer - travel by means of steam power; "The ship steamed off into the Pacific"
navigation, pilotage, piloting - the guidance of ships or airplanes from place to place
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
Translations
باخِرَه
parník
damperdampskib
gufubátur
buharlı gemiistimbot

steamer

[ˈstiːməʳ] N
1. (Culin) → olla f de estofar
2. (Naut) → vapor m, buque m de vapor

steamer

[ˈstiːmər] n
(= boat) → bateau m à vapeur, vapeur m
(for cooking)cuiseur m à vapeursteam iron nfer m à repasser à vapeur

steamer

n (= ship)Dampfer m; (Cook) → Dampf(koch)topf m

steamer

[ˈstiːməʳ] n (steamship) → nave f a vapore, piroscafo (Culin) → pentola per cottura a vapore

steam

(stiːm) noun
1. a gas or vapour that rises from hot or boiling water or other liquid. Steam rose from the plate of soup / the wet earth in the hot sun; a cloud of steam; (also adjective) A sauna is a type of steam bath.
2. power or energy obtained from this. The machinery is driven by steam; Diesel fuel has replaced steam on the railways; (also adjective) steam power, steam engines.
verb
1. to give out steam. A kettle was steaming on the stove.
2. (of a ship, train etc) to move by means of steam. The ship steamed across the bay.
3. to cook by steam. The pudding should be steamed for four hours.
steam-
steam-driven / steam-powered machinery.
ˈsteamer noun
a steamboat or steamship.
ˈsteamy adjective
of, or full of, steam. the steamy atmosphere of the laundry.
ˈsteamboat, ˈsteamship nouns
a ship driven by steam.
steam engine
a moving engine for pulling a train, or a fixed engine, driven by steam.
steam roller
a type of vehicle driven by steam, with wide and heavy wheels for flattening the surface of newly-made roads etc.
full steam ahead
at the greatest speed possible.
get steamed up
to get very upset or angry.
get up steam
to build up energy ready for effort.
let off steam
1. to release steam into the air.
2. to release or get rid of excess energy, emotion etc. The children were letting off steam by running about in the playground.
run out of steam
to lose energy, or become exhausted.
steam up
to (cause to) become covered with steam. The windows steamed up / became steamed up.
under one's own steam
by one's own efforts, without help from others. John gave me a lift in his car, but Mary arrived under her own steam.
References in classic literature ?
In a back room upon the second floor the lad was explaining, not without considerable difficulty, to his grandmother that he had decided to return to England upon the next steamer. He was endeavoring to make it plain to the old lady that she might remain in Africa if she wished but that for his part his conscience demanded that he return to his father and mother, who doubtless were even now suffering untold sorrow because of his absence; from which it may be assumed that his parents had not been acquainted with the plans that he and the old lady had made for their adventure into African wilds.
From London to Suez via Mont Cenis and Brindisi, by rail and steamboats ..............................................................................7 " From Suez to Bombay, by steamer .......................13 " From Bombay to Calcutta, by rail ...............................3 " From Calcutta to Hong Kong, by steamer .................3 " From Hong Kong to Yokohama (Japan), by steamer..........6 " From Yokohama to San Francisco, by steamer ............22 " From San Francisco to New York, by rail ................7 " From New York to London, by steamer and rail............9 "
For Daughtry did not care to be seen on such dog-stealing enterprises and was planning how to get on board the steamer unobserved.
The ape-man had been about to read a note that one of the sailors had handed him as the small boat that bore him to the shore was on the point of returning to the steamer, but at the hail from the vessel's deck he looked up.
I lay in a berth amid the familiar surroundings of the stateroom of a steamer. On a couch opposite sat a man, half undressed for bed, reading a book.
At the sight of the Martian's collapse the captain on the bridge yelled inarticu- lately, and all the crowding passengers on the steamer's stern shouted together.
They had been seen on the Tower Wharf that morning, embarking on board the steamer bound for Rotterdam.
The steamer for Hamburg, and the steamer for Rotterdam, would start from London at about nine on Thursday morning.
It beats and throbs like a pulsating heart within her iron ribs, and when it stops, the steamer, whose life is not so much a contest as the disdainful ignoring of the sea, sickens and dies upon the waves.
A first-class steamer, to be under his own command, and capable of accommodating at least one hundred and fifty cabin passengers, will be selected, in which will be taken a select company, numbering not more than three-fourths of the ship's capacity.
Instead of leaving on the same steamer we are to take in the morning they are to come on a later one.
"The steamer Atlanta from Liverpool put to sea on the 2nd of October, bound for Tampa Town, having on board a Frenchman borne on the list of passengers by the name of Michel Ardan."