steatosis


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ste·a·to·sis

 (stē′ə-tō′sĭs)

steatosis

(ˌstɪəˈtəʊsɪs)
n
the abnormal accumulation of fat within a cell or organ
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
Aramchol's ability to modulate hepatic lipid metabolism was discovered and validated in animal models, demonstrating downregulation of the three key pathologies of NASH: steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis.
However, additional diseases, including alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis and steatosis also may result from heavy drinking.
TEENAGE BOYS with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) who followed a diet low in free sugars demonstrated significantly improved hepatic steatosis after 8 weeks, compared with boys on a usual diet.
Owing to the known limitations of liver biopsy, including its invasive nature and sampling errors, the role of novel non-invasive screening modalities for hepatic fibrosis and steatosis has been a subject of growing interest (8).
Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a pathological state defined excess deposition of fat in the liver ranging from steatosis to hepatitis, cirrhosis and infrequently hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) without history of ample alcohol intake.
Insulin resistance has been implicated as a key condition leading to hepatic steatosis and, subsequently, NASH, a life-threatening form of liver disease.
This finding was also confirmed in autopsy studies with a detection rate of nonalcoholic steatosis in 20%-30% of the cases (2).
Fatty liver or liver steatosis is a common liver disease and the most important causes are overweight and high alcohol consumption.
Liver steatosis or fatty liver is a common disease that affects approximately 25 per cent of the global population.
NAFLD is the hepatic component of pre-diabetes (Paschos & Paletas, 2009) that affects liver function due to fat accumulation (hepatic steatosis) caused by dysfunction of fat metabolism in the liver (Benlhabib et al., 2004), which can lead to, if not treated, more serious complications such as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, cirrhosis, liver failure and even hepatocellular carcinoma (Choi & Diehl, 2005; Paschos & Paletas).
NAFLD is characterized by excessive hepatic fat accumulation (steatosis) and it associates insulin resistance (IR) in the absence of secondary causes and in the absence of excessive alcohol intake ([greater than [greater than or equal to] 30 g for men and [greater than or equal to] 20 g for women).
Spectrum of NAFLD consists of isolated hepatic macrovesicular steatosis at one end and steatohepatitis at the other.