steery

steery

(ˈstɪərɪ)
n, pl -ries
a commotion or disturbance
adj, -rier or -riest
busy or bustling
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
I haven't hit some of the shots I hit today in a long time, but when I get a little steery and don't swing, I try to guide it, I hit some terrible shots.
"The Players is a place you can make some steery swings," he said.
She wrote: "We pulled our 'steery' cart to our Aunt's home in the near vertical Mountjoy Street.
Also, we used the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ; Barraca, 2004) developed to assess experiential avoidance and psychological acceptance, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, Beck, Steery & Brown, 1996) evaluates the presence of symptoms and severity of depression
After a few years, however, the Scots withdrew and the links to Newlyn became more tenuous, with the result that the core of the New English became almost synonymous with the English Impressionists, justifying one reviewer's description of it as 'that Steery, Starry, Stotty lot of painters'.
En la segunda consulta se aplico el BDI-II (Beck Depression Inventory II; Beck, Steery y Brown, 1996) y se pidio a Clara que explicitara por escrito en que notaria ella la mejoria en caso de producirse y en que la notarian los demas (Regla 2).
The NEAC was described by one early critic as that 'Steery, Starry, Stotty lot of painters', and Wilson Steer, Sidney Starr and William Stott of Oldham are all represented in the present exhibition working in Degas's favourite pastel medium.