steeve

(redirected from steeved)
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steeve 1

 (stēv) Nautical
n.
A spar or derrick with a block at one end, used for stowing cargo.
tr.v. steeved, steev·ing, steeves
To stow or pack (cargo) in the hold of a ship.

[From Middle English steven, to stow, probably from Old Spanish estibar, to steeve, or from Old Catalan stivar, both from Latin stīpāre.]

steeve 2

 (stēv) Nautical
n.
The angle formed by the bowsprit and the horizon or the keel.
v. steeved, steev·ing, steeves
v.tr.
To incline (a bowsprit) upward at an angle with the horizon or the keel.
v.intr.
To have an upward inclination. Used of a bowsprit.

[Origin unknown.]

steeve

(stiːv)
n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) a spar having a pulley block at one end, used for stowing cargo on a ship
2. (Nautical Terms) a spar having a pulley block at one end, used for stowing cargo on a ship
vb
(Nautical Terms) (tr) to stow (cargo) securely in the hold of a ship
[C15 steven, probably from Spanish estibar to pack tightly, from Latin stīpāre to cram full]

steeve

(stiːv) nautical
vb
(Nautical Terms) to incline (a bowsprit or other spar) upwards or (of a bowsprit) to incline upwards at an angle from the horizontal
n
(Nautical Terms) such an angle
[C17: of uncertain origin]

steeve1

(stiv)

v. steeved, steev•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to stuff (cotton or other cargo) into a ship's hold.
n.
2. a long derrick or spar, with a block at one end, used in stowing cargo in a ship's hold.
[1475–85; probably < Sp estibar to cram < Latin stīpāre to stuff, pack tightly]

steeve2

(stiv)

v. steeved, steev•ing,
n. v.i.
1. (of a bowsprit or the like) to incline upward at an angle instead of extending horizontally.
v.t.
2. to set (a spar) at an upward inclination.
n.
3. the angle that a bowsprit or the like makes with the horizontal.
[1635–45; orig. uncertain]

steeve


Past participle: steeved
Gerund: steeving

Imperative
steeve
steeve
Present
I steeve
you steeve
he/she/it steeves
we steeve
you steeve
they steeve
Preterite
I steeved
you steeved
he/she/it steeved
we steeved
you steeved
they steeved
Present Continuous
I am steeving
you are steeving
he/she/it is steeving
we are steeving
you are steeving
they are steeving
Present Perfect
I have steeved
you have steeved
he/she/it has steeved
we have steeved
you have steeved
they have steeved
Past Continuous
I was steeving
you were steeving
he/she/it was steeving
we were steeving
you were steeving
they were steeving
Past Perfect
I had steeved
you had steeved
he/she/it had steeved
we had steeved
you had steeved
they had steeved
Future
I will steeve
you will steeve
he/she/it will steeve
we will steeve
you will steeve
they will steeve
Future Perfect
I will have steeved
you will have steeved
he/she/it will have steeved
we will have steeved
you will have steeved
they will have steeved
Future Continuous
I will be steeving
you will be steeving
he/she/it will be steeving
we will be steeving
you will be steeving
they will be steeving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been steeving
you have been steeving
he/she/it has been steeving
we have been steeving
you have been steeving
they have been steeving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been steeving
you will have been steeving
he/she/it will have been steeving
we will have been steeving
you will have been steeving
they will have been steeving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been steeving
you had been steeving
he/she/it had been steeving
we had been steeving
you had been steeving
they had been steeving
Conditional
I would steeve
you would steeve
he/she/it would steeve
we would steeve
you would steeve
they would steeve
Past Conditional
I would have steeved
you would have steeved
he/she/it would have steeved
we would have steeved
you would have steeved
they would have steeved
References in classic literature ?
That yaller, dirty packet with her bowsprit steeved that way, she's the 'Hope of Prague'.