stellar wind

(redirected from stellar winds)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

stellar wind

 (wĭnd)
n.
The varying flow of plasma ejected from the surface of a star into interstellar space.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stel′lar wind′


n.
the radial outflow of ionized gas from a star.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

stellar wind

The flow of plasma into space from the surface of a star.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
"Both of Eta Carinae's stars drive powerful outflows called stellar winds," said team member Michael Corcoran, also at Goddard.
"Both of Eta Carinae's stars drive powerful outflows called stellar winds," Michael Corcoran, a member of the team that observed the star system, said in a NASA (https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2018/nasas-nustar-mission-proves-superstar-eta-carinae-shoots-cosmic-rays) statement .
On instagram, @nasahubble wrote: "The glowing gaseous landscape has been illuminated and carved by the high-energy radiation and strong stellar winds from the massive hot stars in the central cluster.
When they reach old age, they puff up and become bigger, cooler and are more prone to lose mass in the form of stellar winds. When these stars reach the red giant stage, elements like carbon and nitrogen are released into space, ready to be used in subsequent generations of new stars.
Although galaxies might look like pristine "island universes," exchanging stars and gas only when they crash into each other, stellar winds and supernovae regularly blow huge amounts of gas out of their host galaxies.
Created when speedy stellar winds interact with the outer layers of hydrogen ejected by Wolf--Rayet stars, these nebulae are frequently ring-shaped or spherical.
These before-and-after images can help astronomers understand how stellar winds, gas and their environment interact to build a new massive star.
These stars have extremely powerful stellar winds, blowing off huge amounts of material at speeds of 2000 kilometres per second, BBC Science said.
Gradually, the fierce stellar winds from the youngest, most massive stars blow away the gas, revealing bright blue star clusters and giving a "Swiss cheese" appearance to the spiral arms.
The 88 papers presented during the July 2011 meeting share recent research on stellar pulsations, magnetic fields, mass loss and clumping in hot stellar winds, massive star wind models, massive binaries, young open star clusters, and massive star formation.
Observations by the Hubble Space Telescope suggest that powerful stellar winds are sweeping the atmospheric material behind the scorched planet.