stemma

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stem·ma

 (stĕm′ə)
n. pl. stem·ma·ta (stĕm′ə-tə) or stem·mas
1. A scroll recording the genealogy of an ancient Roman family; a family tree.
2. A record or diagram showing the relationships of the manuscripts of a literary work.
3. A simple eye present in certain insect larvae.

[Latin stemma, stemmat-, from Greek, garland, from stephein, to encircle.]

stemma

(ˈstɛmə)
n
(Heraldry) a family tree; pedigree
[C19: via Latin from Greek stemma garland, wreath, from stephein to crown, wreathe]

o•cel•lus

(oʊˈsɛl əs)

n., pl. o•cel•li (oʊˈsɛl aɪ)
1. the simple eye of many invertebrates, consisting of retinal cells, pigments, and nerve fibers.
2. an eyelike spot, as on a peacock feather.
[1810–20; < Latin: little eye, diminutive of oculus eye; see -elle]
o•cel′lar, adj.
oc•el•lat•ed (ˈɒs əˌleɪ tɪd, oʊˈsɛl eɪ tɪd) oc•el•late (ˈɒs əˌleɪt, oʊˈsɛl ɪt, -eɪt) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stemma - a tree diagram showing a reconstruction of the transmission of manuscripts of a literary work
tree diagram, tree - a figure that branches from a single root; "genealogical tree"
2.stemma - the descendants of one individualstemma - the descendants of one individual; "his entire lineage has been warriors"
kinfolk, kinsfolk, phratry, family line, sept, folk, family - people descended from a common ancestor; "his family has lived in Massachusetts since the Mayflower"
side - a family line of descent; "he gets his brains from his father's side"
family tree, genealogy - successive generations of kin
3.stemma - an eye having a single lens
eye, oculus, optic - the organ of sight
ommatidium - any of the numerous small cone-shaped eyes that make up the compound eyes of some arthropods
References in periodicals archive ?
Les Stemmas du Charroi de Nimes et de la Prise d'Orange.
Divergences between sources are cataloged exhaustively, and detailed stemmas help clarify relationships between the sources and illuminate the processes through which the respective works evolved.
Second, later compilers picked the graph that made the most sense to them; but the ones they did not pick remained in other textual stemmas.
Reeve on a particular aspect of post-Lachmannianism, the nature and frequency of bipartite stemmas ('Additional Materials A.