stemmatic

stemmatic

(stɛˈmætɪk)
adj
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) literature of or relating to a textual stemma
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Adj.1.stemmatic - of or relating to a textual stemma
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References in periodicals archive ?
(18) In its simplest form, a CL analysis consists of two steps: first, all transmission chains supporting a hadith are tabulated in a stemmatic diagram, and second, the earliest transmitter--the one from whom the transmission lines start to branch out (the CL)--is identified as responsible for the hadith as it is recorded in the compilations.
To summarize, while the close textual and codicological similarities between A and S place them within one stemmatic subfamily, neither text was copied directly from the other.
More importantly, Supomo does not specify which manual of textual criticism informed the compilation of the stemma and the editorial approach; the result is somewhat idiosyncratic, standing midway between an 'eclectic' and 'stemmatic' approach.
The computerized phylogram singles out two large sets of manuscripts according to the relation of distance/closeness of the witnesses (= what-is-p versus what-is-not-p), but it does not match the tri-partition obtained by stemmatic reconstruction (K, a [T and A1], p); rather, it proposes paradoxically a bipartite configuration (= p/non-p) which is the contradiction inherent in the traditional, nineteenth-century method of Karl Lachmann (see Chiesa 346-50).
In several cases, she provides stemmatic diagrams of hypothetical relationships between the musical sources of a single cantata.
Vazquez next identifies an additional nine manuscripts for collation for reasons of their production date and stemmatic position according to Manly and Rickert (1940).
Schoonhoven's own preference is Ad Liviam De Morte Drusi, based on stemmatic comparisons of surviving titles.
Not only stemmatic complications and polygenous texts, but also phenomena such as the use of texts as play scripts, make it difficult in numerous ways for us to know exactly what we are looking at when we encounter either a manuscript or an edition of a medieval text.
A More theorized discussion, titled "Toward a Disjunctive Philology," is presented by William Robins, who offers some consideration of best-text and stemmatic editions in order to recommend, as a sort of compromise (or escape from the tyranny of these models), a parallel-text edition that highlights the very problems that editors must adjudicate.
Robins gives examples for single-text editing, stemmatic editing, and a dual-method approach, suggesting parallel-text editions for each.