stench


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stench

 (stĕnch)
n.
1. A strong, foul odor; a stink.
2. A foul or objectionable quality: the stench of corrupt government.

[Middle English, from Old English stenc, odor.]
Synonyms: stench, fetor, malodor, reek, stink
These nouns denote a penetrating, objectionable odor: the stench of burning rubber; the fetor of polluted waters; the malodor of diesel fumes; the reek of stale sweat; a stink of decayed flesh.

stench

(stɛntʃ)
n
a strong and extremely offensive odour; stink
[Old English stenc; related to Old Saxon, Old High German stank; see stink]

stench

(stɛntʃ)

n.
1. an offensive smell or odor; stink.
2. a foul quality.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English stenc odor (good or bad); akin to stink]
syn: See odor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stench - a distinctive odor that is offensively unpleasantstench - a distinctive odor that is offensively unpleasant
odour, olfactory perception, olfactory sensation, smell, odor - the sensation that results when olfactory receptors in the nose are stimulated by particular chemicals in gaseous form; "she loved the smell of roses"
niff, pong - an unpleasant smell

stench

noun stink, whiff (Brit. slang), reek, pong (Brit. informal), foul smell, niff (Brit. slang), malodour, mephitis, noisomeness The stench of burning rubber was overpowering.
Translations
نَتانَه
puch
stank
fnykur
tvaikas
smakasmirdoņa
pis koku

stench

[stentʃ] Nhedor m

stench

[ˈstɛntʃ] npuanteur f

stench

nGestank m; stench trapGeruchsverschluss m

stench

[stɛntʃ] npuzzo, fetore m

stench

(stentʃ) noun
a strong, bad smell. the stench of stale tobacco smoke.
References in classic literature ?
Here came the entrails, to be scraped and washed clean for sausage casings; men and women worked here in the midst of a sickening stench, which caused the visitors to hasten by, gasping.
A narrow winding street, full of offence and stench, with other narrow winding streets diverging, all peopled by rags and nightcaps, and all smelling of rags and nightcaps, and all visible things with a brooding look upon them that looked ill.
Then with expanded wings he stears his flight Aloft, incumbent on the dusky Air That felt unusual weight, till on dry Land He lights, if it were Land that ever burn'd With solid, as the Lake with liquid fire; And such appear'd in hue, as when the force Of subterranean wind transports a Hill Torn from PELORUS, or the shatter'd side Of thundring AETNA, whose combustible And fewel'd entrals thence conceiving Fire, Sublim'd with Mineral fury, aid the Winds, And leave a singed bottom all involv'd With stench and smoak: Such resting found the sole Of unblest feet.
The pitch was bubbling in the seams; the nasty stench of the place turned me sick; if ever a man smelt fever and dysentery, it was in that abominable anchorage.
Sometimes they determined to starve me; or at least to shoot me in the face and hands with poisoned arrows, which would soon despatch me; but again they considered, that the stench of so large a carcass might produce a plague in the metropolis, and probably spread through the whole kingdom.
Harkee, my lord Bishop," quoth he, "the stench of your evil actions had reached our nostrils.
Under ordinary circumstances such a stench would have brought our enterprise to an end, but this was no ordinary case, and the high and terrible purpose in which we were involved gave us a strength which rose above merely physical considerations.
The winding way up the ravine between these was scarcely three yards wide, and was disfigured by lumps of decaying fruit-pulp and other refuse, which accounted for the disagreeable stench of the place.
Our ambuscade would have been intolerable, for the stench of the fishy seals was most distressing {45}--who would go to bed with a sea monster if he could help it?
It is good and profitable, John, to freshen the understanding, and support the wavering, by the observance of our holy festivals; but all form is but stench in the nostrils of the Holy One, unless it be accompanied by a devout and humble spirit.
A horrible stench of decayed fish filled the air as the pillar of white sank, and the water bubbled oilily.
We cannot help perceiving abundance of filth in every kennel, and, were it not for the over-powering fumes of idolatrous incense, I have no doubt we should find a most intolerable stench.