feces

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fe·ces

 (fē′sēz)
n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
Waste matter eliminated from the bowels; excrement.

[Middle English, from Latin faecēs, pl. of faex, dregs.]

feces

(ˈfiːsiːz)
pl n
(Physiology) the usual US spelling of faeces

fe•ces

(ˈfi siz)

n. (used with a pl. v.)
waste matter discharged from the intestines through the anus; excrement.
Also, esp. Brit., faeces.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Latin faecēs grounds, dregs, sediment (pl. of faex)]

feces

The body wastes discharged from the rectum. They are made up of indigestible food, bacteria, and secretions.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.feces - solid excretory product evacuated from the bowelsfeces - solid excretory product evacuated from the bowels
dog do, dog shit, dog turd, doggy do - fecal droppings from a dog
body waste, excrement, excreta, excretory product, excretion - waste matter (as urine or sweat but especially feces) discharged from the body
poop, shit, shite, turd, crap, dirt - obscene terms for feces
droppings, dung, muck - fecal matter of animals
meconium - thick dark green mucoid material that is the first feces of a newborn child
melaena, melena - abnormally dark tarry feces containing blood (usually from gastrointestinal bleeding)
Translations

faeces

(American) feces (ˈfiːsiːz) noun plural
solid waste matter passed out from the body.

fe·ces

n., pl. heces, excremento.

feces

npl heces fpl
References in periodicals archive ?
eisque curarent tu[ erenturque/ ar]bitratu aedilium pleibeium,[quei] comque essent, neiue ustrinae (11) in /eis loceis regionibusue niue poci ustri nae cussa fierent, niee stercus terra [m] ue intra ea loca fecisse coniecisseue veli[t] quei haec loca ab paa[g]o Montano//[reddempta habebit, et uti si is stercus in eis loceis fecerit terramue in ea] loca iecerit, in .
A study by Michael Cusato delves into the early friars' relationship to money, reviled as turpe lucrum, stercus, and serpens.
To quote but a few examples, our sympathy toward the poised Coluccio Salutati losing all his gravitas in biting Antonio Loschi ("spurcissimorum spurcissime, stercus et egeries Lombardorum, vel potius Longobardorum" 26) is counterbalanced by the crassness of Poggio Bracciolini, who informs us that the young body of his loathed adversary, Tommaso Morroni, was once used as latrina publica (58).