stere


Also found in: Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to stere: imbrue

stere

a unit of volume equal to one cubic meter
Not to be confused with:
steer – to guide or direct the course of; a young ox castrated and raised for beef
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

stere

 (stîr)
n. Abbr. s
A unit of volume equal to one cubic meter.

[French stère, from Greek stereos, solid, hard; see ster- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stere

(stɪə)
n
(Units) a unit used to measure volumes of stacked timber equal to one cubic metre (35.315 cubic feet)
[C18: from French stère, from Greek stereos solid]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

stere

(stɪər)

n.
a cubic meter, equivalent to 35.2 cubic feet, used to measure cordwood.
[1790–1800; < French stère < Greek stereós solid]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

stere

A unit of volume, especially used for measuring timber. 1 stere = 1 m3.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
Socialist views, and somehow hostile to the Russian Narodism, had also numerous activists from Bessarabia, such as Constantin Stere, one of the founders, along Garabet Ibraileanu (considered the father of populism), of "Viata Romaneasca" magazine.
5:10, "beati qui persecutionem patiuntur propter iustitiam" [blessed are those who endure persecution for the sake of justice], to "Pay ar happen also Pat con her hert stere" (Patience 27).
[2] Saed Alrabaee, Noman Saleem, Stere Preda, Lingyu Wang, and Mourad Debbabi.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION: desert; destroy; DESTROYER; deter; doest; dost; dote; doter; erst; ester; eyot; oersted; oyster; reset; resort; resorted; rest; rested; restore; restored; rete; retro; retry; rorty; roster; rostered; rote; ryot; sort; sorted; sorter; steed; steer; stere; stereo; store; stored; storer; storey; story; strode; stye; teed; teredo; teres; terry; terse; terser; tody; toed; tore; torr; torse; toyed; tree; treed; trey; trod; troy; tyre; tyred; tyro.
With occupational nouns, the suffix "ster" (often "stere" or "stre") was sometimes added to words as a feminine form.
Tragically enough, the precise number of victims is still disputed, yet the historic existence of the events is beyond any doubt (Stere, 2008; Morar, 2007).
Et de preciser qu'avec une stere de bois, on peut faire cuire du pain pendant trois jours.
(3) Providing all eight Beatitudes in lines 13-28 highlights the fact that the first and last blessings, of those "pat han in hert pouerte" and those "pat con her hert stere" (13, 27), promise the same reward: "hores is pe heuen-ryche" (14, 28).
(29) A sixth component of radical nationalist ideology that had only a minor following was poporanism (i.e., the ideology of politician Constantin Stere), founded on the idea that the Romanian people had a strong archaic nature that admitted no social infestations or adjustments.
When the memorialist Constantin Stere spoke of a "very picturesque incident "taking place in the Romanian Parliament, he referred to an unusual event, an unexpected occurrence, which resulted from the violation of the common law during a moment of protocol suspension, of rules interruption.