stereognosis


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Related to stereognosis: Romberg test

stereognosis

(ˌstɛrɪɒɡˈnəʊsɪs; ˌstɪər-)
n
(Psychology) the perception of depth or three-dimensionality through any of the senses
[C20: stereo- + gnosis]
Translations
stéréognosie
References in periodicals archive ?
Tactile domain subtests examine stereognosis, finger identification, and the ability to recognize shapes drawn on the hand.
Cortical Function Assessment12 (CFA) was used to assess cortical functions: sensory extinction, dictation, naming, writing, repetition, drawing, and stereognosis. It is a simple, bedside, 10-item clinical assessment.
Stereognosis was tested with children placing both hands through the holes in a screen with elbows resting on a table and being asked to look at a board with 9 object pairs that were moderately similar in shape and size but different in texture, weight, or somatosensory details (e.g., wooden button with holes/metal coin, plastic spoon/fork).
Otherwise, the neurological status of the patients was normal, and especially, no dysfunction of position sense, vibration, stereognosis, and two-point discrimination was found.
Vision recovers in the hemianopic field in stages starting with perception of light and followed by motion, form, colour and stereognosis in that order.
(30) The CNI was comprised of 3 subscales, including: (a) motor coordination (MC) involving finger-nose test, finger-thumb tapping, finger-thumb opposition, dysdiadochokinesia, fist-edge-palm test, and Oseretsky test; (b) sensory integration (SI) involving extinction, finger agnosia, stereognosis, agraphesthesia, and left-right orientation; and (c) disinhibition (DI) involving Go/No-go test.
(2,48,57) At the Mobility Clinic, we also consider testing the cranial nerves, gross vision, cerebellar testing (Romberg, finger-to-nose, heelto-shin, and hand flip), proprioception, monofilament, graphesthesia, and stereognosis. (2,48,49) The Trendelenburg and side-lying resisted hip abduction tests are quite useful for assessing pelvic stability.
Our nerves are so sensitive, we can tell a quarter from a dime in our pocket (stereognosis) and can tell where our fingers are without looking (proprioception).
This was further confirmed by the improvement in activities involving stereognosis, for example, being able to find keys in a pocket.
Oral sensation including two-point discrimination, oral stereognosis, vibrotactile detection, somesthetic sensitivity, proprioception, and thermal sensitivity has been observed in old and young age.
Oral stereognosis (recognition of forms in the mouth) can be utilized to predict the treatment outcomes of prosthodontic rehabilitation.