stereophony


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to stereophony: Stereo sound

ster·e·o·phon·ic

 (stĕr′ē-ə-fŏn′ĭk, stîr′-)
adj.
Of or used in a sound-reproduction system that uses two or more separate channels to give a more natural distribution of sound.

ster′e·o·phon′i·cal·ly adv.
ster′e·oph′on·y (-ē-ŏf′ə-nē) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stereophony - reproducer in which two microphones feed two or more loudspeakers to give a three-dimensional effect to the soundstereophony - reproducer in which two microphones feed two or more loudspeakers to give a three-dimensional effect to the sound
amplifier - electronic equipment that increases strength of signals passing through it
boom box, ghetto blaster - a portable stereo
iPod - (trademark) a pocket-sized device used to play music files
quadraphonic system, quadraphony, quadriphonic system - a stereophonic sound recording or reproducing system using four separate channels
reproducer - an audio system that can reproduce and amplify signals to produce sound
Walkman - (trademark) a pocket-sized stereo system with light weight earphones
Translations

stereophony

[sterɪˈɒfənɪ] Nestereofonía f

stereophony

nStereofonie f, → Stereophonie f, → Raumklang m
References in periodicals archive ?
The DTS: X stereo sound technology adds stereophony to the content regardless of its source.
In "Introduction: Living Stereo," the editors note that "given the significance and even, perhaps, the centrality of stereophony in contemporary musical and acoustic culture, it is surprising that stereo's widespread aesthetic, social and economic implications have been largely ignored in music, sound, and media studies" (p.
Perhaps the most intimate and nuanced example of an "erotics" of reading is articulated in Barthes' The Pleasure of the Text, in which he describes how his assumptions, his expectation of the "clarity of messages," give way at times to the "bliss" of language experienced by the body, "a whole carnal stereophony: the articulation of the body, of the tongue, not that of meaning" (1981, 66-67).
(48) Kerrigan writes of a "stereophony which disperses ...
Demonstrations of 3-D were offered alongside presentations of other novelties, such as television projection and stereophony, at London's Telecinema, attracting nearly half a million people over a five-month run.
Living Stereo: Histories and Cultures of Multichannel Sound recreates a history of music and sound and helps the reader to understand the stereophony that todayAEs American culture takes for granted.
Fournet was a remarkable figure who at the time of the massive taking up of stereophony at the end of the 1950s, as well as in the following decades, may not have dazzled in the Karajan or Bernstein mode yet always gained respect and aroused awe, which are still recalled today.