stereoscope


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stereoscope

ster·e·o·scope

 (stĕr′ē-ə-skōp′, stîr′-)
n.
An optical instrument with two eyepieces used to impart a three-dimensional effect to two photographs of the same scene taken at slightly different angles.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stereoscope

(ˈstɛrɪəˌskəʊp; ˈstɪər-)
n
(Photography) an optical instrument for viewing two-dimensional pictures and giving them an illusion of depth and relief. It has a binocular eyepiece through which two slightly different pictures of the same object are viewed, one with each eye
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ster•e•o•scope

(ˈstɛr i əˌskoʊp, ˈstɪər-)

n.
an optical instrument through which two pictures of the same object, taken from slightly different points of view, are viewed, one by each eye, producing the effect of a single picture of the object, with the appearance of depth or relief.
[1830–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ster·e·o·scope

(stĕr′ē-ə-skōp′)
An optical instrument through which two slightly different views of the same scene are presented, one to each eye, giving an illusion of three dimensions.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Stereoscope

A lightweight handheld optical instrument for viewing side-by-side photographs taken with a special camera so that the combined image appeared to be three-dimensional. The two photographs were printed on a card about the size of a postcard.
1001 Words and Phrases You Never Knew You Didn’t Know by W.R. Runyan Copyright © 2011 by W.R. Runyan
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Stereoscope - an optical device for viewing stereoscopic photographsstereoscope - an optical device for viewing stereoscopic photographs
optical device - a device for producing or controlling light
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

stereoscope

[ˈsterɪəskəʊp] Nestereoscopio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

stereoscope

nStereoskop nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

stereoscope

[ˈstɛrɪəˌskəʊp] nstereoscopio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The Repair Shop 7pm The team members restore a bicycle with a patriotic past, a threadbare teddy on wheels, a Victorian firefighter's helmet and a vintage stereoscope viewer.
Sally Owen, Newbury, Berks A Your Viewmaster is a stereoscope and was made by Swayers from the Forties to display colour images of world events and places.
"The children played there and there was a stereoscope - which makes two cards seem to merge into a 3D image - in one of the rooms for the children.
It's a cropped picture of one half of a stereoscope photograph captioned: "The Leicesters' attack baffles
The pictures were taken with a Leica DFC265 camera attached to a Leica M165C stereoscope microscope, connected to a computer with the Leica Application Suite software, which includes an auto-montage module.
Palestine through the Stereoscope: A Tour Conducted by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut and Charles Foster Kent.
After Kodak color films were introduced about three decades ago, the stereoscope even became a means of virtual tourism.
In the laboratory, using tweezers and a light stereoscope, seeds were gently removed from the capitula and only the full (100% of the vital tissues for germination: tegument and embryo) and mature (brown tegument) seeds were selected.
Observe the samples under the stereoscope microscope for quantitative and qualitative analysis of both treated and controlled group soil samples.
Pursuing a career-long obsession, Salvesen deftly explores the origins and impact of the stereoscope, featuring historic images by Jules Duboscq, Oskar Fischinger, Salvador Dal-, and others.
Virtual reality dates back to the 1800s, when the first stereoscope was invented.