stereoscope

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Related to stereoscopes: stereoscopic photography, stereographs
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stereoscope

ster·e·o·scope

 (stĕr′ē-ə-skōp′, stîr′-)
n.
An optical instrument with two eyepieces used to impart a three-dimensional effect to two photographs of the same scene taken at slightly different angles.

stereoscope

(ˈstɛrɪəˌskəʊp; ˈstɪər-)
n
(Photography) an optical instrument for viewing two-dimensional pictures and giving them an illusion of depth and relief. It has a binocular eyepiece through which two slightly different pictures of the same object are viewed, one with each eye

ster•e•o•scope

(ˈstɛr i əˌskoʊp, ˈstɪər-)

n.
an optical instrument through which two pictures of the same object, taken from slightly different points of view, are viewed, one by each eye, producing the effect of a single picture of the object, with the appearance of depth or relief.
[1830–40]

ster·e·o·scope

(stĕr′ē-ə-skōp′)
An optical instrument through which two slightly different views of the same scene are presented, one to each eye, giving an illusion of three dimensions.

Stereoscope

A lightweight handheld optical instrument for viewing side-by-side photographs taken with a special camera so that the combined image appeared to be three-dimensional. The two photographs were printed on a card about the size of a postcard.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Stereoscope - an optical device for viewing stereoscopic photographsstereoscope - an optical device for viewing stereoscopic photographs
optical device - a device for producing or controlling light
Translations

stereoscope

[ˈsterɪəskəʊp] Nestereoscopio m

stereoscope

nStereoskop nt

stereoscope

[ˈstɛrɪəˌskəʊp] nstereoscopio
References in periodicals archive ?
Liverpool Medical Institution - Professor Van Helsing's Wunderkammer - See Victorian stereoscopes, zoetropes and praxinoscopes.
A These stereoscopes were used to view images taken using a special camera that had two lenses and gave a 3D appearance.
These images are analyzed in the context of simultaneous developments in technologies for viewing the human body, such as movie cameras, stereoscopes, and printing technologies that distributed images more widely than ever before.
2016 and 2017 will be known as the years where early virtual reality becomes a reality, as a myriad of headsets are set to hit the market over the next few months, each carrying with them the promise to leave classic View-Master-style stereoscopes feeling obsolete--that is, if they aren't already.
While some believed that 3D stereoscopes gave birth to virtual reality, there were others who said that technology was its birth mother.
The binary structure of Zola's novel presents the same jarring effects as those crafted in stereoscopes and Caillebotte's paintings.
"The first thing that came to my mind was to use existing structures in the street and latch onto those in order to place the stereoscopes," Lotfi explains.
She's interested in the Luddite movement and in the lives and working conditions of historical and contemporary women textile workers, and her work often combines old technologies, such as camera obscuras, microscopes and stereoscopes, with new technologies like digital fabrication and video projection.
"It's like the way the medieval Church relied on Renaissance paintings to convey their message in the days before modern illustrations came about, or how hand-held View-Master stereoscopes in the 1950s crudely predated the incredible 3D special effects we have today.
As in Black Sun, 2005; The Dark Hearts, 2003-2004; Disappear Here, 2004; and Hans and Grete, the video's two-screen projection conjures the twinned images of nineteenth-century stereoscopes. Likewise, the sculpture Untitled (disappear here), 2011, installed in the room adjacent to the one where The Ghosts was being screened, is modeled on the praxino-scope.
Furthermore, stationary examples of these types of pictures have been around since Victorian times (Wheatstone stereoscopes), and films have been around since the craze for them in the 1950s.