stereotyped


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ster·e·o·typed

 (stĕr′ē-ə-tīpt′, stîr′-)
adj.
1. Lacking originality, creativity, or individuality.
2. Conforming to a social norm; conventional.
3. Of or relating to stereotypy: stereotyped behavior.
4. Printing Printed or reproduced from stereotype plates.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stereotyped

(ˈstɛrɪəˌtaɪpt; ˈstɪər-)
adj
1. lacking originality or individuality; conventional; trite
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) reproduced from or on a stereotype printing plate
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ster•e•o•typed

(ˈstɛr i əˌtaɪpt, ˈstɪər-)

adj.
fixed or settled in form; lacking freshness or originality; hackneyed; conventional.
[1810–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.stereotyped - lacking spontaneity or originality or individualitystereotyped - lacking spontaneity or originality or individuality; "stereotyped phrases of condolence"; "even his profanity was unimaginative"
conventional - unimaginative and conformist; "conventional bourgeois lives"; "conventional attitudes"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

stereotyped

adjective unoriginal, stock, standard, tired, conventional, played out, stale, banal, standardized, mass-produced, corny (slang), threadbare, trite, hackneyed, overused, platitudinous, cliché-ridden Listeners seem to have stereotyped ideas.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

stereotyped

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Yet the old time fairy tale, having served for generations, may now be classed as "historical" in the children's library; for the time has come for a series of newer "wonder tales" in which the stereotyped genie, dwarf and fairy are eliminated, together with all the horrible and blood-curdling incidents devised by their authors to point a fearsome moral to each tale.
In Ionia and the islands the epic poets followed the Homeric tradition, singing of romantic subjects in the now stereotyped heroic style, and showing originality only in their choice of legends hitherto neglected or summarily and imperfectly treated.
He did everything with an air which put your attention on the alert and raised your expectations, but the result somehow was always on stereotyped lines, unsuggestive, empty of any lesson that one could lay to heart.
The dancer's smile of stereotyped enthusiasm was turned for ten minutes upon the faces of her audience.
I have already heard much of you in Petersburg and wanted to get to know you," said she to Natasha with her stereotyped and lovely smile.
Sheldon plodded on, and decided that the old stereotyped duel was far simpler and easier than this protracted hide-and-seek affair.
These slips were printed in stereotyped forms and he had received hundreds of them - as many as a dozen or more on each of his earlier manuscripts.
The lines of her body were long, clean and symmetrical; it was a body which occasionally fell into splendid poses; there was no suggestion of the trim, stereotyped fashion-plate about it.
The tables might as well have been stereotyped, they varied so little.
She tried to draw him into conversation relative to his plans to aid her, but all that she could get from him was his stereotyped prophecy as to the future state of the wind.
The flutter on the Tonopah Stock Exchange lasted just ten days, during which time his smashing, wild-bull game played ducks and drakes with the more stereotyped gamblers, and at the end of which time, having gambled Floridel into his fist, he let go for a net profit of half a million.
He never responded to more than one encore, which was always "Home, Sweet Home." After that, while the audience clapped and stamped its approval and delight of the dog Caruso, Jacob Henderson would appear on the stage, bowing and smiling in stereotyped gladness and gratefulness, rest his right hand on Michael's shoulders with a play-acted assumption of comradeliness, whereupon both Henderson and Michael would bow ere the final curtain went down.