sternite


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ster·nite

 (stûr′nīt)
n.
A sclerite making up part of the sternum of an arthropod.

sternite

(ˈstɜːnaɪt)
n
the sternum or ventral part of each segment of an insect body
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5 mm, 4th and 5th mutilated in holotype and paratype , among three segments, 2nd is longest and 3rd is smallest segment; labium extending to fourth abdominal sternite, length of labial segments: I 2.
Sternites 2-7 rectangular with a caudal row of setae, irregular mesal rows of setae and a pair of trichoid sensilla; sternite 8 sclerotized, rectangular, conspicuously shorter than sternite 7, with scattered setae near distal margin and at mesal region and a pair of trichoid sensilla.
Male: sternite IV with similar width and height; sternite V "V-shaped"; cercus and surstylus with almost the same length of the aedeagus.
It possesses the typical setal pattern of Passalini and of the subgenus Passalus section "Neleus" (see Schuster & Reyes-Castillo 1981), lacking the lateral shield setae of the pronotum, the lateral mesonotal setae, the lateral metanotal setae and all the abdominal setae save in the ninth sternite which presents one abdominal seta.
The 6th abdominal sternite gibbous, the 7th abdominal sternite with a triangular ridge at its front margin pointing to the subgenital plate (Figs 26-27).
Fore femur annulated with dark and light; seventh sternite of female extending to apex of abdomen, covering genitalia from below, eight tergite subrectangular, its apical emargination wide; parameres subcylindrical, slightly narrowed toward apex .
In Portunidae, as in other members of Eubrachyura, the vagina opens into the vulva, located in the sixth thoracic sternite (Pyle and Cronin, 1950; Johnson, 1980; Guinot et al.
Body: General color and external characters as in male, with body and wings slightly larger, antenna slightly shorter, fourth abdominal tergite dark brown with irregular spots, sometimes orange-yellow on basal half and brown on apical half, fourth abdominal sternite dark brown, sometimes uniformly black.
In primitive termites, there are no differences in the caste developmental pathways between sexes, and it is easy to discriminate between sexes using abdominal sternite morphology (Weesner, 1969; Jones and La Fage, 1980; Zimet and Stuart, 1982; Myles and Chang, 1984; Henderson and Rao, 1993).
simplex are larger extending to sternite VI with the posterior margin rounded medially and angling equally to the medial and lateral margins and overlapping for 2/3 to 3/4 of their length while opercula of T.