sthenic


Also found in: Medical.

sthen·ic

 (sthĕn′ĭk)
adj.
Relating to or marked by sthenia; strong, vigorous, or active.

sthenic

(ˈsθɛnɪk)
adj
abounding in energy or bodily strength; active or strong
[C18: from New Latin sthenicus, from Greek sthenos force, on the model of asthenic]
References in periodicals archive ?
Gao, Studies on the Underlying Mechanism of Liver-Qi Sthenic Dispersedness--Analyses on the Differential Expression of Sevcral Important Hormone and Neurotransmitter Receptor Genes in the Brain Tissue of Premenstrual Syndrome Liver-Qi Sthenia Symptom, Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 2006.
We observe the negative correlation between the asthenic and the sthenic experience (-0,485), which prove the contrary positions of these two types of religious experiences.
The chapter's backward glances to Brown's "sthenic" understimulation (127) as a source for this shared irritability are detours from an otherwise convincing triptych of readings.
As James says in The Varieties of Religious Experience, religion, as opposed to morality, is an "absolute addition" to life (20) It's a "sthenic" feeling, "an excitement of the cheerful, expansive, "dynamogenic" order which, like any tonic, freshens our vital powers." (21) Religion is a "flood and waterspout," he says in the same work.
Studies on Chinese medicine certified that the active component of Atractylodes Rhizoma, [beta]-Eudesmol, has the function of preventing the evil wetness, and Gypsum Fibrosum is generally used to prevent and cure sthenic fever and domination disease (Chen et al., 2006).
In the emotional component, sthenic (joy, admiration, optimism, etc.) and asthenic emotions (fear, anxiety, stress, uneasiness, etc.) were assessed.
For example, Bontrager (2) noted that well-developed athletes with a sthenic or hyposthenic body habitus often require centering between 8 and 9 inches from the vertebra prominens.
Prynne's sthenic interrelation of factual information, quotation, diatribe, digression, erotics, economics, spiritual, scientific, biological, and geophysical reference, all sprinkled with indeterminate referents like it, that, and there, cannot clear-cut a first position, a "mind of winter" in the parlance of Wallace Stevens.
Enchmen calls the pleasant reaction "organic sthenic," and the unpleasant reaction "organic asthenic." The formation of new analyzers depends on sthenic consequences.