stickler

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stick·ler

 (stĭk′lər)
n.
1. One who insists on something unyieldingly: a stickler for neatness.
2. Something puzzling or difficult.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stickler

(ˈstɪklə)
n
1. (usually foll by for) a person who makes insistent demands: a stickler for accuracy.
2. a problem or puzzle: the investigation proved to be a stickler.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

stick•ler

(ˈstɪk lər)

n.
1. a person who insists on something unyieldingly (usu. fol. by for).
2. any puzzling or difficult problem.
[1530–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stickler - someone who insists on something; "a stickler for promptness"
disciplinarian, martinet, moralist - someone who demands exact conformity to rules and forms
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

stickler

noun fanatic, nut (slang), maniac (informal), purist, perfectionist, pedant, martinet, hard taskmaster, fusspot (Brit. informal) I'm a bit of a stickler for accuracy.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
hnidopich

stickler

[ˈstɪkləʳ] N to be a stickler forinsistir mucho en
he's a real stickler for correct spellinginsiste mucho en la correcta ortografía
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

stickler

[ˈstɪklər] n
to be a stickler for sth → être pointilleux/euse sur qchstick-on [ˈstɪkɒn] adj [label, badge] → adhésif/ivestick shift n (US) [car] → levier m de vitessesstick-up [ˈstɪkʌp] n (= hold-up) → braquage m , hold-up m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

stickler

n to be a stickler for somethinges mit etw peinlich genau nehmen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

stickler

[ˈstɪkləʳ] n to be a stickler foressere esigente in fatto di, essere pignolo/a su
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
They are terrible sticklers for convention and even etiquette in other people.
I could understand its not being considered gentlemanly to put your hands in other people's pockets (especially by the other people), but how, O ye sticklers for what looks this and what looks that, can putting his hands in his own pockets make a man less gentle?
Now, no men are greater sticklers for the arbitrary dominion of genius and talent than your artists.
For the King of Bekwando, drunk or sober, was a stickler for etiquette.
Damon, who, once having been a businessman, was sometimes a stickler for small points.
The interference of the partners in the business of the ship, also, was not calculated to have a favorable effect on a stickler for authority like himself, especially in his actual state of feeling towards them.
Minnie had always been a stickler. She had called him down the second time she walked out with him, because he had gone along on the inside, and she had laid the law down to him that a gentleman always walked on the outside - when he was with a lady.
The cellars were filled with burgundy then, the kennels with hounds, and the stables with gallant hunters; now, such horses as Queen's Crawley possessed went to plough, or ran in the Trafalgar Coach; and it was with a team of these very horses, on an off-day, that Miss Sharp was brought to the Hall; for boor as he was, Sir Pitt was a stickler for his dignity while at home, and seldom drove out but with four horses, and though he dined off boiled mutton, had always three footmen to serve it.